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So far OCF News Team - B has created 32 blog entries.

The case for having dentists on your cancer care team

Author: New York University Source:www.medicalexpress.com Cancer treatment often takes a team of health professionals—oncologists, nurses, surgeons, radiologists, pathologists, and social workers—to coordinate and provide comprehensive support for patients. At NYU, dentists are increasingly being considered an important part of the cancer care team. When faced with a cancer diagnosis, many patients push other health care to the side to focus on addressing the disease. But people with cancer can experience unique issues related to their oral health. For instance, radiation to the head and neck can damage the salivary glands, hurting their ability to produce saliva, which can lead to tooth decay or cavities. Radiation and chemotherapy can also cause painful mouth sores. Patients with cancer that has spread to their bones, or who are undergoing treatment that can weaken their bones, may be prescribed high doses of antiresorptive medications such as bisphosphonates. These medications can cause a rare condition called osteonecrosis of the jaw, in which the jawbone is exposed through the gums. Other treatments—including chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants—lower the immune system, leaving patients susceptible to infection. Infections in the mouth during cancer treatment are especially dangerous, given the immune system's inability to fight back. "An abscessed tooth may mean having to stop chemotherapy to treat the infection," says Denise Trochesset, clinical professor and chair of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology and Medicine at NYU College of Dentistry. "Fortunately, intervening early to eliminate infection can minimize complications during the course of therapy," says Dalal Alhajji, [...]

2022-08-04T15:04:22-07:00August, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

Developing a non-invasive test, OrisDX aims to offer a ‘game changer’ for detecting oral cancer

Author: Melissa Fassbender Source: www.news.uchicago.edu OrisDX has developed a novel saliva-based molecular test to detect and diagnose oral cancer earlier—improving patient outcomes and saving lives. The Chicago-based startup was formed based on a decade of research in the field of liquid biopsy and cancer genomics at the University of Chicago and Johns Hopkins University by top physicians and scientists, including co-founders Nishant Agrawal, Chetan Bettegowda, Rifat Hasina and Evgeny Izumchenko. Currently, no oral cancer salivary diagnostics are endorsed by the American Dental Association. The standard for detecting head and neck cancer is a biopsy, which often occurs at late stages, and is associated with poorer patient outcomes. Using biomarker-based molecular genomic techniques to diagnose oral cavity cancers earlier, OrisDX’s technology is based on the latest science and has been proven in clinical studies. “This is going to be a game changer in the field for oral cancer,” said Agrawal, OrisDX CEO and section chief for otolaryngology and head and neck surgery at UChicago Medicine. As a surgeon and as a clinician, Agrawal treats patients with oral cancer every day and sees advanced-stage oral cavity cancer all too often, with most of his patients presenting with Stage 3 or 4 cancers. “It didn’t make sense why most of our patients presented to us with these advanced stages,” said Agrawal. His professional network includes other surgeons and head and neck oncologists who have helped confirm the team’s belief that its test will be valuable to providers and patients alike. Improving outcomes OrisDX’s [...]

2022-08-04T14:54:34-07:00August, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

Vital Signs: Human papillomavirus vaccine is cancer prevention

Author: Brenna Robertson Source: www.dailyprogress.com In a world of pandemics, vaccines, tests, and what feel like new threats to our health and safety every day, it is sometimes important to look back and review the basics of our personal health. This is particularly applicable when we think of infections that very easily spread from person to person. One such infection is the human papillomavirus (HPV). What is HPV? HPV, or human papillomavirus, is a group of more than 200 viruses, some of which can cause cancers, including cervical, oropharyngeal and anal cancer. About 75% of HPV-type viruses can cause warts or papillomas (non-cancerous tumors), while the other 25% affect mucosal areas such as the vagina, penis, anus and mouth. Although HPV causes more than 99% of cervical cancer cases, the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) states about 70% of oropharyngeal cancer is linked to HPV infections in the mouth and upper throat. Screening is important HPV impacts anyone of any gender, and anyone of any age can develop cancer after infection. It is so common, the CDC reports, that nearly everyone will get an HPV infection at some point in life. Because the virus can go undetected, it can put people at risk of developing cancer or unknowingly spreading the infection. The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women start pap screenings at age 21. Early detection of oropharyngeal cancer is possible with routine mouth and upper throat screenings, so individuals should talk to their [...]

2022-07-26T09:12:30-07:00July, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

‘Extremely Healthy’ Physical Trainer Thought His ‘Internal Bleeding’ Was Tonsillitis: It Turned Out To Be Cancer And He Had To Relearn Eating, Drinking

Author: Adam Kovac Source: www.survivornet.com An army veteran and personal trainer had to learn to eat and drink again after what he thought was tonsillitis turned out to be oral cancer in his tongue, tonsils and lymph nodes. Lee Webb, 52, told The Mirror he had avoided doctors for 20 years until summer 2021, when he was recovering from a bout with COVID-19. But when tonsillitis symptoms persisted, he said he realized something else was going on. “I had internal bleeds and I was taken to the hospital for that. It was my first time in the ambulance, first time touching base with the (National Health Service) after many, many years,” Webb said. “They told me to visit the ear, nose and throat department but I never received an appointment letter because it went to my old address. That just shows how long I didn’t see doctors. A few months later, around October, I had a second bout of what I thought was tonsillitis, but also I noticed a lump in my neck. That’s when I started being concerned.” While that lump appeared in October, 2021, Webb said his oral cancer diagnosis was delayed to February as the healthcare system was still struggling with the pandemic. “For over a month I tried to make an appointment with the GP,” he said. “All I heard was that the lines were broken. Keep trying. In January, I thought it was a third bout of this thing, but the lump was getting bigger. [...]

2022-07-22T09:43:25-07:00July, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

Can an Enlarged Tongue Be a Sign of Multiple Myeloma?

Author: Olga Askinazi, PhD Source: www.healthline.com Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells. A plasma cell is a special type of white blood cell in the bone marrow that, in healthy people, helps the immune system fight infections by making antibodies. If plasma cells start growing out of control, they form a cancerous tumor called multiple myeloma (MM). Although there’s no cure for MM, appropriate treatment can bring it into remission, which means having no or few symptoms of the disease. It can be challenging to recognize MM because its symptoms vary depending on the person. Initial stages of the disease often have no noticeable signs at all. One of the rare signs of MM is an enlarged (swollen) tongue. This condition only occurs with MM-related amyloidosis. This happens when cancer-causing plasma creates irregular antibodies that build up in your organs, in this case, your tongue. Multiple myeloma and tongue amyloidosis The term “amyloidosis” means a buildup of an abnormal protein (called amyloid) in your body. In the case of MM, amyloid buildup happens because cancerous plasma cells make abnormal antibodies. These antibodies can stick together and form clumps in your organs, most commonly: kidneys heart liver Amyloidosis is not very common. It happens in 10% to 15% of people with MM. What about tongue amyloidosis? This rare condition occurs when the antibody amyloid builds up in your tongue, making it large, swollen, and painful (macroglossia). Your tongue can sometimes look rippled around the edges. It’s more common in [...]

2022-07-21T09:35:28-07:00July, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

Diagnostic Utility of Cytokeratin 17 Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Review

Author: Ankita Gyanchandani, et all Source: www.cureus.com Abstract One of the most common oral malignancies is oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Although the prevalence of oral cancer varies worldwide, it is generally agreed that the oral cavity is a common anatomical site for cancer, depending primarily on the country (and even particular region in some countries) and gender of the patients. Finding diagnostic markers for OSCC is critical for early diagnosis and personalised treatment of patients. Because they are overexpressed in OSCC relative to normal mucosa, cytokeratins (CKs), intermediate filaments of the cytoskeletons, are possibilities for diagnostic markers of OSCC. CK17 should be targeted as a diagnostic marker for OSCC among the CKs, as multiple other CKs have been linked to the disease. This study aims to assess the immuno-histochemistry expression of CK17 and to investigate whether there is a link between CK17 and OSCC differentiation. Introduction & Background Oral cancer refers to a collection of tumours that can affect any part of the mouth, pharynx, or salivary glands. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is thought to account for more than 90% of all oral neoplasms [1]. Despite breakthroughs in therapeutic techniques, OSCC morbidity and mortality rates have remained relatively unchanged over the previous 30 years. Males have rates of 6.6/100,000 and 3.1/100,000 morbidity and mortality, respectively, whereas females have rates of 2.9/100,000 and 1.4/100,000. Oral cancer is also six times more likely to develop in alcohol drinkers than in non-drinkers [1]. The combination of tobacco and alcohol use constitutes [...]

2022-07-20T07:34:35-07:00July, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

Lifting the Stigma: The Importance of HPV Vaccination Education in Head and Neck Cancer

Author: Hayley Virgil Source: www.cancernetwork.com Although a stigma has persisted surrounding human papillomavirus (HPV)–associated head and neck cancers, a lot of progress has been made through education efforts within the head and neck surgical oncology community, according to Tom Thomas, MD, MPH, an Otolaryngologist and director of Head and Neck Reconstructive Surgery and Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) at the Leonard B. Kahn Head and Neck Cancer Institute at Morristown Medical Center of Atlantic Health System in New Jersey, said in an interview with Cancer Network. The main reason for stigma to persist is due to lack of public understanding of the science behind HPV infection and disease progression.HPV is a family of over 150 viruses and the leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) in the world, but a minority can cause cancer. Most of us are often exposed to HPV through intimate contact, but we can fight off the disease and eliminate it.However, in a small minority of us, disease could potentially remain dormant for decades before resurfacing. “We don't know the triggers of this coming back as cancer later, stated Dr. Thomas. When it comes to HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer, Dr. Thomas is careful in counseling patients and their current partners about the long latency of the virus. Without this premise, there can be misunderstanding and distrust in the relationship, that can affect cancer treatment. If caught early, the disease has a good cure rate. “HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer is a curable cancer. If caught early and treated [...]

2022-06-29T15:15:31-07:00June, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

FDA Grants Fast Track Designation to PDS0101 Plus Pembrolizumab in Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

Author: Ariana Pelosci Source: www.cancernetwork.com Fast track designation was granted to PDS0101 plus pembrolizumab, which is currently being assessed in the phase 2 VERSATILE study in patients with recurrent or metastatic human papillomavirus 16–positive head and neck cancer. PDS0101 plus pembrolizumab (Keytruda) has been granted fast track designation by the FDA for patients with recurrent or metastatic human papillomavirus (HPV) 16–positive head and neck cancer, according to a press release from PDS Biotechnology.1 The combination is currently being investigated in the phase 2 VERSATILE-002 study (NCT04260126) in the aforementioned patient population. PDS0101 is a subcutaneous T cell HPV-specific immunotherapeutic that can encourage high levels of CD8-positive and CD-4 positive T cells. This is achieved by activating numerous immune pathways. These T cells have been observed to target different tumors that have occurred as a result of HPV16 infection. “We are thrilled that the FDA has granted fast track designation for PDS0101 in combination with [pembrolizumab],” Frank Bedu-Addo, PhD, chief executive officer of PDS Biotech, said in the press release. “The HPV-associated head and neck cancer prevalence continues to rise, leaving this affected group with limited treatment options to date. Receiving this designation underscores the potential of the Versamune® platform and the need for a new therapy that may improve outcomes for those with this devastating disease.” At the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, results from the trial were presented.2 In stage 1 of the study, 17 patients were included who were checkpoint inhibitor naïve with 4 [...]

2022-06-29T15:16:49-07:00June, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

Primary Transoral Surgery Yields Good Swallowing Outcomes Despite Increased Risk of Death in HPV-related OPSCC

Author: Hayley Virgil Source: www.cancernetwork.com Despite an increased risk of grade 5 toxicities, patients with human papillomavirus–related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who received primary transoral surgery and neck dissection vs radiotherapy experienced good swallowing outcomes at 1 year. Good swallowing outcomes were observed at 1 year among patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)–related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who were treated with primary transoral surgery (TOS) and neck dissection vs radiotherapy despite an increased risk of developing grade 5 toxicities, according to findings from the phase 2 ORATOR2 trial (NCT03210103). At a median follow up of 17 months, investigators reported 3 deaths in both the TOS and neck dissection arm, 2 of which were treatment related and 1 due to myocardial infarction at 8.5 months. The 2 treatment-related deaths were reported following TORS and were due to oropharyngeal hemorrhage and cervical vertebral osteomyelitis. Moreover, investigators reported 4 progression-free survival (PFS) events in this arm, 3 of which were mortality events and 1 due to local recurrence. As such, overall survival (OS) and PFS data were considered immature at the time of study. In total, 67% of patients in the radiotherapy arm and 71% in the TOS and neck dissection arm experienced grade 2 to 5 toxic effects. The study included patients who were 18 years or older with T1 to T2 disease and N0 to N2 staging. Those who enrolled were randomized 1:1 to either the primary radiotherapy group, including 60 Gys followed by concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy at 40 mg/m2 in [...]

2022-06-29T15:19:48-07:00June, 2022|Oral Cancer News|

Acupuncture Improves Symptoms of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia in Head and Neck Cancer

Author: Andrea S. Blevins Primeau, PhD, MBA Source: www.cancertherapyadvisor.com Acupuncture can improve symptoms of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer, according to a phase 3 trial presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting 2022. Patients who underwent true acupuncture reported greater improvements in symptoms and quality of life than did patients who underwent sham acupuncture and those who received standard oral hygiene alone. These results suggest that acupuncture should be considered for treating radiation-induced xerostomia, said study presenter Lorenzo Cohen, PhD, of MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Dr Cohen explained that current treatments for radiation-induced xerostomia have a low success rate, but small studies have suggested that acupuncture may relieve symptoms. The researchers therefore set out to evaluate acupuncture in a randomized, phase 3, controlled trial. The trial enrolled adults with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The patients had received bilateral radiation therapy and subsequently developed grade 2-3 xerostomia. All patients completed radiation therapy at least 12 months before enrollment, and parotid glands and at least 1 submandibular gland were intact. A total of 258 patients underwent randomization. They all received standard oral hygiene and were randomly assigned to undergo true acupuncture (n=86), sham acupuncture (n=86), or no additional intervention (n=86). Patients who underwent acupuncture did so twice weekly for 4 weeks. Patients who achieved a minor response continued with true or sham acupuncture for an additional 4 weeks. Baseline characteristics were well balanced across the arms. A majority of patients were men, were [...]

2022-06-23T23:41:07-07:00June, 2022|Oral Cancer News|
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