smoking

Researchers: Favorable survival, fewer side effects after reduced therapy for HPV-linked head and neck cancer

Source: medicalxpress.com
Author: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers reported that reducing the intensity of radiation treatment for patients with human papillomavirus-associated head and neck cancer produced a promising two-year progression-free survival rate and resulted in fewer side effects.

The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, were drawn from a phase II clinical trial that included 114 patients with HPV-linked head and neck cancer and a limited smoking history. The researchers reported that they saw a similar progression free survival rate, and that patients experienced fewer long-term side effects in the study compared with patients who received standard intensity treatment in previous studies.

“A simple de-intensification strategy of reducing radiation and chemotherapy appears to be as effective at cancer control as the standard seven-week regimen,” said UNC Lineberger’s Bhishamjit S. Chera, MD, associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology. “Furthermore, there were fewer toxicities.”

For the trial, patients received six weeks of treatment, including a reduced intensity of radiation therapy of 60 Gray with weekly low-dose chemotherapy of cisplatin. The standard of care regimen is seven weeks of treatment 70 Gray and high-dose chemotherapy.

The main outcome that the researchers were studying was two-year progression-free survival. On the reduced regimen, researchers found that the two-year progression free survival was 86 percent, compared to a two-year progression free survival reported from other studies using standard treatment doses of 87 percent.

Chera said the major long-term side effects of radiation treatment are related to swallowing and dry mouth. Previous studies have shown the majority of patients treated with standard intensity chemoradiotherapy require a temporary feeding tube and some have significant long-term swallowing dysfunction.

Notably, in this study, patients reported that their swallowing returned to baseline after de-intensified treatment, and only 34 percent required a temporary feeding tube.

The results need to be validated in larger, randomized clinical trials, Chera said, and studies are ongoing to investigate this.

He added that while this study included patients with a limited smoking history, other current studies include patients with more extensive smoking histories.

Chera said that researchers want to continue to improve two-year progression free response rates while achieving better side effect results. They want to do that by identifying additional biomarkers to drive precision medicine strategies.

Although traditional clinical risk help clinicians predict outcomes and select patients for clinical trials of de-intensified treatments, Chera said that these risk factors are imprecise. He and his colleagues are currently evaluating additional novel biomarkers that they believe could be used to better predict a patient’s prognosis and outline a course of treatment.

Specifically, they have shown in a previous study how levels of circulating HPV DNA in the blood, and how quickly patients clear this from the blood, were linked to outcomes.

September, 2019|Oral Cancer News|

‘Whitish patch’: increase in oral dysplasia in young adults

Source: www.medscape.com
Author: Kristin Jenkins

Most 8-year-olds with a wiggly tooth expect the Tooth Fairy to tuck some money under their pillow. In the case of one little Canadian boy, his wiggly tooth got him an incisional biopsy, a diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a partial maxillectomy, and a defect that was closed with local advancement flaps.

“This was the most unusual case we’ve seen,” said Marco A. Magalhaes, DDS, PhD, assistant professor of oral pathology and oral medicine in the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada.

“OSCC predominantly affects patients 40 years of age and older,” write Magalhaes and colleagues in a case study report published in November 2016 in Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology. “It is extremely rare in patients younger than 20 years of age.”

The clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings in this young patient were distinctive. Although the diagnosis and treatment were challenging, the clinical course was favorable at follow-up, the authors said. This case illustrates the fact that even pediatric patients can be at risk for OSCC. Magalhaes said that he and other dentists are concerned about the rising number of OSCC cases in patients who are in their 20s and 30s. These patients have no known risk factors and are often without symptoms. Many are diagnosed with high-grade oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) that rapidly progresses to cancer, Magalhaes told Medscape Medical News.

“When you look at the distribution of cases of oral dysplasia or carcinoma, you see that they tend to occur in older males in their 50s with a history of smoking and a low risk of [malignant] transformation,” he explained.

“What we are seeing in practice, however, is a lot of dysplasia in younger individuals without risk factors. These cases are the most concerning,” he commented.

At the time of presentation, patients may say, “I’m not sure why I’m here, but I saw a whitish patch in my mouth,’ ” said Magalhaes.

Others may be asymptomatic and have “absolutely no concerns,” he pointed out. “Unfortunately, this story is becoming more common.”

Nonhealing Sore in Mouth
Oral cancer usually presents as a nonhealing sore that is often painful. OED can be more difficult to diagnose because it manifests as a faint whitish or red patch anywhere in the oral cavity.

The gums, tongue, soft palate, and the inside of the cheeks can be affected. Most commonly, the floor of the mouth is affected.

Currently, Magalhaes and colleagues are conducting a review of more than 3000 cases of dysplasia in Ontario to determine group distribution, pattern, and, potentially, risk factors.

Although oral cancer has multiple causal factors, Magalhaes noted that smoking is “by far” the most significant and well-recognized risk factor. Heavy alcohol consumption is also a well-known risk factor. Human papillomavirus accounts for 5% to 6% of oral cancers, he noted.

A regular dental checkup is important, and early detection is critical for survival, Magalhaes emphasized.

For high-grade OED, the risk for progression to frank carcinoma is 18% to 30%, he noted. For moderate-grade OED, the risk is 10% to 15%, and for low-grade oral dysplasia, it is 1% to 4%.

“Physicians should reinforce to their patients the importance of dental checkups at least twice a year,” Magalhaes said. “This alone would increase the chances of early lesion detection.”

Review of Biopsy Specimens
A recent review of 63,483 biopsy specimens submitted by dentists to the Toronto Oral Pathology Service (TOPS) primarily from 2005 through 2015 bears this out. The review, led by Magalhaes, was published online April 25 in the Journal of the American Dental Association.

TOPS is operated by the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto and is one of the largest oral pathology services in Canada, noted Magalhaes, who works there.

The results show that generally, the incidence of OED (2679 cases) and OSCC (828 cases) in Ontario remained stable from 2005 to 2015. It also showed that when it comes to early detection of oral lesions, dentists have seriously stepped up their game. During the 10-year period, detection of OED by dentists increased 3.8-fold. The number of OSCC cases they detected doubled. OSCC accounted for about 10% of all oral cancers in the province in 2015.

“These biopsy specimens were submitted mostly by specialists in oral and maxillofacial surgery, periodontics, endodontics, and oral and maxillofacial pathology and oral medicine,” the authors write.

“However,” they continue, “informal discussion with clinicians who submitted the biopsy specimens has indicated that the initial detection of the mucosal abnormality was often accomplished by the general practice dentist, dental hygienist, or both, who referred the patient to specialists for evaluation, biopsy, and case management.”

The study also shows that potentially malignant lesions made up 4.68% of all cases and that OED accounted for 90%. An increased awareness of early lesions with malignant potential can result in early diagnosis and decreased morbidity and mortality from OSCC, the researchers say.

Both dentists and patients appear to be maintaining a high index of suspicion, according to Magalhaes.

“Dentists are increasingly aware of the presence of these early lesions and are either biopsying them themselves or sending them for biopsy,” he explained. “We’ve also noticed that patients are more aware of mouth changes and are asking dentists about lesions that they have identified.”

During a routine dental checkup, an examination for early signs of oral cancer is performed. This includes inspection of the lymph glands in the neck and a check of all mucosal surfaces in the oral cavity for signs of ulcers or red or white patches.

The severity of OED determines treatment, noted Magalhaes. In cases of low-grade OED, the lesion is monitored every 6 months, and a repeat biopsy is performed if warranted. A high-grade OED that is accessible and relatively well contained is treated with complete surgical excision. This is followed by monitoring two or three times a year. When the lesion is diffuse, affects 60% of the oral cavity, or extends into areas that are difficult to access without significant morbidity, the patient is closely monitored with examinations four times a year, he said.

Source:
J Am Dent Assoc. Published online April 25, 2019. Abstract

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol. 2016 Nov;122:e179-e185. Full text

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month: Self-exams, early detection can save lives

Source: www.prnewswire.com
Author: press release

Because early detection of oral cancer offers a greater chance of a cure, the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) is reminding the public during Oral Cancer Awareness Month of the importance of performing monthly self-exams.

AAOMS promotes self-exams and screenings every April with the Oral Cancer Foundation, which predicts about 53,000 new cases of oral cancer will be diagnosed in 2019 in the United States – leading to more than 9,000 deaths.

“A monthly self-exam takes only minutes and could potentially save your life,” said AAOMS President A. Thomas Indresano, DMD, FACS. “If done on a regular basis, you’re increasing the chances of identifying changes or new growths early. The survival rate for oral cancer is between 80 and 90 percent when it’s found at early stages of development.”

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) encourage a six-step oral cancer self-exam that involves looking and feeling inside the mouth for suspicious sores and feeling the jaw and neck for lumps. Using a bright light and a mirror:

  1. First remove any dentures.
  2. Look and feel inside the lips and the front of the gums.
  3. Tilt the head back to inspect and feel the roof of the mouth.
  4. Pull the cheek out to inspect it and the gums in the back.
  5. Pull out the tongue and look at its top and bottom.
  6. Feel for lumps or enlarged lymph nodes in both sides of the neck, including under the lower jaws.

Oral cancer symptoms may include one or more of the following if they are persistent and not resolving:

  • Red, white or black patches in the soft tissue of the mouth.
  • A sore in the mouth that fails to heal within two weeks and bleeds easily.
  • An abnormal lump or hard spot in the mouth.
  • A painless, firm, fixated mass or lump felt on the outside of the neck that has been present for at least two weeks.
  • Difficulty in swallowing, including a feeling food is caught in the throat.
  • Chronic sore throat, hoarseness or coughing.
  • A chronic earache on one side.

The risk factors for oral cancer include smoking and tobacco use, alcohol consumption and the human papillomavirus (HPV).

“About 25 percent of oral cancer patients have no known risk factors,” Dr. Indresano said. “It’s important that everyone perform a monthly self-exam. And if you have any of the symptoms for more than two weeks, promptly contact an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. OMSs are experts in diagnosing and surgically treating oral cancer.”

April, 2019|Oral Cancer News|

Flossing and going to the dentist linked to lower risk of oral cancer

Source: www.livescience.com
Author: Yasemin Saplakoglu, Staff Writer

Regularly flossing and going to the dentist may be tied to a lower risk of oral cancer.

That’s according to findings presented March 31, here at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting.

In the new study, researchers analyzed the dental health behaviors of patients who were diagnosed with oral cancer between 2011 and 2014 at the ear, nose and throat clinic at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. The patients’ behaviors were compared to those of non-cancer patients who came to the clinic for other reasons, such as dizziness or an earache. [7 Odd Things That Raise Your Risk of Cancer (and 1 That Doesn’t)]

All of the patients in the study had responded to a survey that included questions about how often they flossed, how often they went to the dentist, how sexually active they were and if they smoked or drank alcohol.

Oral cancer can be divided into two categories: those driven by the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV) and those that aren’t, said lead study author Jitesh Shewale, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. (Smoking and drinking are both risk factors for non-HPV oral cancers.)

After adjusting for factors such as age, gender, socioeconomic status and race, the researchers found that oral HPV-negative people who went to the dentist less than once a year had nearly twice the risk of developing oral cancer than those who went once a year or more. Similarly, oral HPV-negative people who flossed less than once a day had over twice the risk than those who flossed more. In other words, poor oral hygiene was linked to increased non-HPV oral cancer risk.

The study didn’t find an association between poor dental hygiene and oral cancer in those who also had oral HPV, however.

The researchers hypothesize that the oral microbiome may play a role in the association between oral hygiene and cancer risk. In previous research, scientists from the same team found evidence that “poor oral hygiene practices causes a shift in your oral microbiome,” Shewale told Live Science. That shift “promotes chronic inflammation and [can lead to] the development of cancers.” HPV-positive oral cancers mostly affect the base of the tongue and the tonsils region, while HPV-negative cancers mostly affect oral cavities, which are more affected by oral hygiene, he added.

Denise Laronde, an associate professor in dentistry at the University of British Columbia who was not a part of the study, said that the new research was “interesting” but added that it was too early to draw conclusions. (The study found an association between oral hygiene and cancer risk, but did not show cause-and-effect.)

Still, “a lot of the times people look at their oral health as almost disconnected from the rest of their body,” Laronde told Live Science. “But so many systemic diseases are reflected in your oral health and vice versa.”

Laronde added that the new research will hopefully raise awareness about the importance of flossing. “We all know people say they floss way more than they do,” she said. But studies like this raise awareness that “you’re not just flossing to keep your teeth, you’re flossing to maintain your health.”

The findings have not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

April, 2019|Oral Cancer News|

Robot that can cut out hard-to-reach throat tumours through patients’ mouths: Pioneering operation reduces need for chemo and radiotherapy

Source: www.dailymail.co.uk
Author: Fiona McCrae, Roger Dobson

British surgeons are using a cutting-edge robot to remove difficult-to-reach throat tumours – through the mouths of patients.

The pioneering operation is designed to dramatically reduce the need for gruelling radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which can leave patients unable to swallow and dependent on a feeding tube for life.

With growing numbers of people developing throat cancer, it is more important than ever to have a range of effective treatments that lessen the impact on quality of life, says Asit Arora, consultant head and neck surgeon at Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Trust in London.

Once most common in elderly people with a history of drinking and smoking, rates of head and neck cancers have soared by 31 per cent in the past 25 years and are now as common in people in their 50s as in those in their 80s.

The 90 minute operation is designed to dramatically reduce the need for gruelling radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which can leave patients unable to swallow and dependent on a feeding tube for life

Much of the rise is attributed to HPV – a range of viruses that can be passed on during intimate and sexual contact. At least 80 per cent of the adult population carries some kinds of HPV on their skin, although most will never know it. In some cases, HPV can cause skin or genital warts, and other types are a known cause of cervical and anal cancers.

HPV can also infect the mouth and throat and is now to blame for at least half of throat cancers in the UK. Until a tumour occurs, the infection is typically symptomless.

Conventional treatment for early-stage throat cancer involves either powerful radiotherapy and chemotherapy to destroy the tumour, or laser surgery to cut it out.

Courses of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are time-consuming – some patients make up to 30 trips to hospital over a few months. The treatment can also damage the jaw and the swallowing muscles, meaning patients cannot eat without the help of a feeding tube.

Laser treatment is more gentle on the body but it can be difficult to cut out a hard-to-reach cancer completely and most patients need radiotherapy afterwards. Some also need chemotherapy.

Using the robot, the surgeon can zero in on the tumour and cut it away precisely. With the patient under general anaesthetic, the surgeon controls the robot with his hands and feet. One of the robot arms holds a 3D camera, while two others wield tiny instruments that can be passed through the mouth and into the throat, and turned and twisted in ways impossible with the human hand alone.

Surgery in the mouth and throat can be challenging because you are working in very small areas, manipulating surgical instruments in a tight space where there are important nerves and blood vessels to be avoided,’ says Mr Arora, who has pioneered robotic surgery for throat cancer in the UK.

‘With the latest robotic systems, we can be more targeted than ever before in how we treat these throat conditions in order to reduce unwanted side effects, particularly related to swallowing.’

Studies suggest that trans-oral robotic surgery (TORS) is at least as good as conventional surgery, although a definitive comparison has yet to be carried out, says Mr Arora. But importantly, by cutting out the tumour so precisely, it may reduce the amount of chemotherapy and radiotherapy patients need.

A £4.5 million Cancer Research UK trial into the procedure is now being carried out at Guy’s and hospitals around the country.

Mr Arora has used the method to remove about 30 throat tumours in the year since setting up the service with Jean-Pierre Jeannon, Guy’s clinical director for cancer.

The operation takes 90 minutes and patients are usually discharged after two days. They then undertake rehab, including speech therapy.

Retired policeman David Wonfor, 60, chose to take part in the trial after being diagnosed with early-stage throat cancer last summer. After his operation, David, 60, of Petts Wood, Kent, started on five weeks of low-dose radiotherapy. Although he lost weight and his sense of taste at first, he has now largely recovered, and says he is convinced that his recovery would have been very different if he had had chemotherapy.

March, 2019|Oral Cancer News|

HPV infection may be behind rise in vocal-cord cancers among young nonsmokers

Source: www.eurekalert.org
Author: Public Release Massachusetts General Hospital

A remarkable recent increase in the diagnosis of vocal-cord cancer in young adults appears to be the result of infection with strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) that also cause cervical cancer and other malignancies. Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) describe finding HPV infection in all tested samples of vocal-cord cancer from 10 patients diagnosed at age 30 or under, most of whom were non-smokers. Their report appears in a special supplement on innovations in laryngeal surgery that accompanies the March 2019 issue of Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology.

“Over the past 150 years, vocal-cord or glottic cancer has been almost exclusively a disease associated with smoking and almost entirely seen in patients over 40 years old,” says Steven Zeitels, MD, director of the MGH Division of Laryngeal Surgery, senior author of the report. “Today nonsmokers are approaching 50 percent of glottic cancer patients, and it is common for them to be diagnosed under the age of 40. This epidemiologic transformation of vocal-cord cancer is a significant public health issue, due to the diagnostic confusion it can create.”

The researchers note that the increase in vocal-cord cancer diagnosis appears to mimic an earlier increase in the diagnosis of throat cancer, which has been associated with infections by high-risk strains of HPV. After initially attributing incidents of vocal-cord cancer in nonsmokers, which they began to see about 15 years ago, to increased travel and exposure to infectious diseases, Zeitels and his colleagues decided to investigate whether HPV infection might explain the diagnosis in younger nonsmokers.

To do so they examined the records of patients treated by Zeitels either from July 1990 to June 2004 at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary or between July 2004 and June 2018 at MGH. Of 353 patients treated for vocal-cord cancer during the entire period, none of the 112 treated from 1990 to mid-2004 were age 30 or younger. But 11 of the 241 patients treated from 2004 to 2018 were 30 or younger – 3 were age 10 to 19 – and only 3 of the 11 were smokers. Analysis of tissue samples from the tumors of 10 of the 11 younger patients revealed high-risk strains of HPV in all of them.

The authors note that these high-risk-HPV-associated vocal-cord cancers greatly resemble recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP), a benign condition caused by common, low-risk strains of HPV. One of the 11 patients treated by Zeitels had previously been diagnosed at another center with vocal-cord cancer, and when it recurred after being surgically removed, she was misdiagnosed with RRP and treated with a medication that made the cancer worse, leading to the need for a partial laryngectomy.

“Benign RRP of the vocal cords has been a well-known HPV disease for more than a century, and it is very remarkable that there is now an HPV malignancy that looks so similar, creating diagnostic and therapeutic confusion,” says Zeitels, the Eugene B. Casey Professor of Laryngeal Surgery at Harvard Medical School. “It should be noted that these HPV-associated vocal-cord carcinomas are not a malignant degeneration of the benign disease.”

Zeitels adds that HPV vocal-cord cancers are amenable to endoscopic treatment with the angiolytic KTP laser that he developed. “Large-scale studies are now needed to determine the pace of the increase in glottic cancer among nonsmokers, the incidence of high-risk HPV in these cancers and changes in the age and genders of those affected,” he says.

Note:
The lead author of the Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology paper is Semirra Bayan, MD, previously a fellow in laryngeal surgery at MGH and now at University of Chicago Medicine; William Faquin, MD, PhD, MGH Pathology, is a co-author. The study was supported by the Voice Health Institute, the National Philanthropic Trust, and the Eugene B. Casey Foundation.

March, 2019|Oral Cancer News|

Early detection, treatment helps conquer oral cancer

Source: www.newsbug.info
Author: Bob Moulesong

According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, almost 50,000 cases of oral cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2018. The American Cancer Society reports that 10,000 people will die from the disease this year. Half of all people diagnosed with oral cancer will be alive in five years, according to both sources.

While those are disquieting statistics, Region physicians say routine checkups and early diagnosis improve the odds.

Oral cancer
Oral cancer includes cancers of the lips, tongue, cheeks, floor of the mouth, hard and soft palate, sinuses, saliva glands, and throat.

“People we see usually come to us for a lesion or ulcer found in the mouth or throat,” says Dr. Akta Kakodkar, an ear, nose and throat specialist with Community Healthcare System. “Some of them experience no pain but notice a growth or patch of discolored tissue in their mouth, cheek or gum.”

Kakodkar, who with her husband and fellow Community ENT physician, Dr. Kedar Kakodkar, treats oral cancer patients, is quick to point out that not every lesion, ulcer or mouth sore is cancer.

“We see hundreds of nervous patients who have bacterial or fungal infections,” she says. “Treatment with antibiotics or antifungal medications clear up many of these lesions. There are also many white and red patches that clear up on their own.”

The only way to know is a thorough examination.

Types and risk factors
“Most cases of oral cancer are linked to use of tobacco, alcohol and betel nuts, or infection with HPV,” Kakodkar says. “There are major risks associated with tobacco use, whether it’s smoking or chewing.”

There are two main types of oral cancer. Most prevalent is squamous cell carcinoma, accounting for more than 90 percent of cancers that occur in the oral cavity and oropharynx. Slow-growing verrucous carcinoma makes up more than 5 percent of oral cavity tumors.

First steps
Kakodkar says prevention is the best defense. “Your primary care physician may examine your head, neck, mouth and throat for abnormalities,” she says.

Self-exam may uncover a lesion or sore. “Remember, many of these are very treatable and are not cancer,” Kakodkar says. “But don’t wait. Cancer never goes away by itself.”

When Kakodkar discovers a suspicious lesion, she recommends a biopsy: “Depending on several variables, we might do the biopsy in clinic, or we may do it in a hospital setting.”

Once the results return, a plan of action can be established. “Usually, the next steps include imaging, such as a CT scan,” she says. “We also order a PET scan, which tells us what stage the cancer is in and whether or not it has spread.”

Treatment
Kakodkar says she prefers to go straight to surgery. “Many oral cancers are still small and local,” she explains. “Removing them completely is the best way to stop the spread of the cancer.”

Depending on the type and stage of the cancer, radiation and/or chemotherapy may be used.

“I want people to know that surgery for oral cancer is frequently a simple procedure,” Kakodkar says. “Oral cancer is frequently found early due to its visibility. Almost 90 percent of cancer patients in stage 1 or 2 recover and survive.”

A dental checkup
“Oral cancer screening is crucial during a dental examination,” says Dr. Ami Pandya, dentist at Family Dental Care in Valparaiso. “Recognizing abnormal tissue in a patient’s mouth could indicate precancerous tissues, and when identified early could save your life.”

A dentist will perform a thorough head and neck exam, which includes an oral cancer screening. “Dentists will complete extraoral examinations by palpating your jaw line to feel for any suspicious lumps that are not routinely present in these areas,” Pandya says.

A dentist will examine the intraoral tissues of your mouth and look for any suspicious lesions. “We examine the patient’s tongue, the floor of their mouth, and their gingival tissue,” Pandya says. Red and/or white patches can become cancerous.

Many doctors including Pandya have begun using VELscope, a light-based technology to detect precancerous tissues. It’s a wireless hand-held device that scans tissue, with abnormalities showing up as a dark black color.

“VELscope can detect abnormalities before they have a clinical presentation,” Pandya says. “It’s an incredible aid with oral cancer screening.”

Pandya recommends an annual VELscope examination for low-risk adults. Higher risk patients should get a VELscope exam each appointment.

Under the VELscope, cancer shows up as black, says Dr. Ami Pandya

If the dentist detects an abnormality, he or she informs the patient, noting the size, color and location of the lesion. A two-week follow-up is standard. “Oftentimes, these lesions resolve,” Pandya says. If it doesn’t resolve after two weeks, the patient is referred for further evaluation.

Note: This article originally ran on nwitimes.com.

November, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Patients with HPV-positive oropharynx cancer should receive chemoradiation

Source: medicalxpress.com
Author: provided by European Society for Medical Oncology

Patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive throat cancer should receive chemoradiotherapy rather than cetuximab with radiotherapy, according to late-breaking research reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.

“Many patients have been receiving cetuximab with radiotherapy on the assumption that it was as effective as chemotherapy with radiotherapy and caused less side effects but there has been no head-to-head comparison of the two treatments,” said study author Prof Hisham Mehanna, Chair, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Cancer and Genomic Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK.

Throat cancer is rapidly becoming more common in Western countries. For example in the UK, incidence was unchanged in 1970 to 1995, then doubled in 1996 to 2006, and doubled again in 2006 to 2010.The rise has been attributed to HPV, a sexually transmitted infection. Most throat cancer was previously caused by smoking and alcohol and affected 65-70 year-old working class men. Today HPV is the main cause and patients are around 55, middle class, working, and have young children.

HPV-positive throat cancer responds well to a combination of cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and patients can survive for 30-40 years, but the treatment causes lifelong side effects including dry mouth, difficulty swallowing, and loss of taste. Patients deemed unable to tolerate chemotherapy, for example because of poor kidney function or older age, receive cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, and radiotherapy.

This study compared side effects and survival with the two treatments in 334 patients with HPV-positive throat cancer enrolled from 32 centres in the UK, Ireland, and the Netherlands. Patients were randomly allocated to radiotherapy and either cisplatin or cetuximab. Eight in ten patients were male and the average age was 57 years.

During the two-year study there were ten recurrences and six deaths with cisplatin compared to 29 recurrences and 20 deaths with cetuximab. Patients on cisplatin had a significantly higher two-year overall survival rate (97.5%) than those on cetuximab (89.4%; p=0.001, hazard ratio [HR] 4.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70-14.67). Cancer was over three times more likely to recur in two years with cetuximab compared to cisplatin, with recurrence rates of 16.1% versus 6.0%, respectively (p=0.0007, HR 3.39, 95% CI 1.61-7.19).

There were no differences between groups in the overall number of side effects, or of acute or late severe (grade 3-5) toxic events including dry mouth and difficulty swallowing. There were significantly more serious adverse events such as renal and haematological problems with cisplatin than with cetuximab.

Mehanna said: “Cetuximab did not cause less toxicity and resulted in worse overall survival and more cancer recurrence than cisplatin. This was a surprise—we thought it would lead to the same survival rates but better toxicity. Patients with throat cancer who are HPV positive should be given cisplatin, and not cetuximab, where possible.”

Commenting on the study for ESMO, Dr. Branislav Bystricky, Head, Medical and Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospital Trencin, Slovakia, said: “It was believed that cetuximab causes less side effects and was therefore a good option for HPV-positive throat cancer patients who are young and expected to survive for several decades, as well as those less able to tolerate chemotherapy. This study shows that the best treatment choice for patients with HPV-positive throat cancer is cisplatin and radiotherapy. This combination gives ‘double’ the benefit since it is more effective in terms of survival and does not worsen all grade toxicity compared to cetuximab with radiotherapy.”

Bystricky noted that the results were in agreement with interim findings of the US National Cancer Institute’s RTOG 1016 trial, which is scheduled to report this month. He said: “We now have two studies showing that these patients should not be given cetuximab. Future research should examine whether genotyping for the KRAS-variant can select a group of patients that will benefit from cetuximab treatment with radiotherapy.”

October, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Oral cancer a risk when consuming cannabis, warns orthodontist

Source: www.cbc.ca
Author: staff

Eating or smoking pot can pose some deadly health risks, according to the president of the Essex County Dental Association.

“One of the more common ones that you hear about is oral cancer,” said Dr. Mark Parete​, adding cannabis contains known carcinogens, similar to what’s found in tobacco.

He said the ingestion of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana’s main psychoactive ingredient, into a person’s blood stream weakens their immune system and leaves gums and teeth prone to infection.

“Just like nicotine, it actually causes a generalized inflammation which ultimately breaks down collagen and bone — which is the support system of your teeth,” said Parete​.

Full disclosure between patients and medical professionals is extremely important in treating heath events. Parete​ said people shouldn’t be shy of revealing cannabis use to their dentist or orthodontist.

“When the patients come in, we always update our medical history … Inform us if you have any new medications, including using marijuana for recreational or medicinal purposes,” he said.

Indirect health impacts can occur through cannabis use, Parete​ warns. He said when the “munchies” come calling, cannabis users aren’t usually making the best choices in terms of their oral health.

“It’s probably not your healthy fruits and vegetables. So, if you can, we really advise our patients to swish your mouth some water after eating just to make sure you’re flushing any kind of sugars off the teeth to prevent dental cavities.”

October, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Youth vaping has soared in 2018, new data show

Source: www.wsj.com
Authors: Betsy McKay and Jennifer Maloney

Number of high schoolers who used e-cigarettes in the past 30 days has risen some 75% in 2018

Teen use of e-cigarettes has soared this year, according to new research conducted in 2018 that suggest fast-changing youth habits will pose a challenge for public-health officials, schools and parents.

The number of high-school students who used e-cigarettes in the past 30 days has risen roughly 75% since last year, according to a person who has seen new preliminary federal data.

That would equate to about three million, or about 20% of high-school students, up from 1.73 million, or 11.7% of high-school students in the most recently published federal numbers from 2017.

Nearly a third of 13-to-18-year-olds who responded to a separate survey conducted by The Wall Street Journal with research firm Mercury Analytics said they currently vape.

The new numbers offer a rare look at evolving teen vaping habits. Sales of e-cigarettes are expected nearly to double this year over 2017, and researchers have wondered how much of that increase is because of teen use. But there can be a long lag time between the collection of data and public reports.

Most of the teens who vape said they are doing it for reasons other than to quit smoking, according to the Journal’s survey conducted in 49 states in May. More than half said they do it because they like the flavors that e-cigarette liquids come in and they think vaping is fun. More than two-thirds said they believe vaping can be part of a “healthy life.”

U.S. Food and Drug Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said last week that teen use “has reached an epidemic proportion.” He announced new measures to curb teen vaping and warned he is considering banning flavored products.

The preliminary federal numbers from 2018 are from the government’s latest National Youth Tobacco Survey, according to the person familiar with the data. The survey was conducted in the spring.

The number of high-school users of combustible, or traditional, cigarettes increased slightly from the 2017 survey, this person said.

Monitoring the Future, a long-running youth survey conducted by the University of Michigan, found in 2017 that 16.6% of 12th-graders and 13.1% of 10th-graders had vaped nicotine, marijuana or flavoring in the previous 30 days. Richard Miech, the survey’s principal investigator, said he believes there has been a “considerable jump” in adolescent vaping this year.

This year’s sales growth has been driven largely by the Juul, a slim device that resembles a flash drive and has become a status symbol among teens, who often vape sweet-flavored liquids like mango. Juul has a 72.8% dollar share of the estimated $2.5 billion market in channels measured by market-research firm Nielsen, according to a Wells Fargo analysis.

Health officials are concerned that the high levels of nicotine in some liquids can alter the chemistry of developing brains, making them more sensitive to addiction.

Juul Labs Inc. says its device is intended to help adult smokers quit. “We cannot be more emphatic on this point: No minor or non-nicotine user should ever try JUUL,” a spokeswoman said. “Our packaging includes a prominent nicotine label and clearly states for adult smokers.”

Parents and educators say they are trying to do more to combat vaping with children back to school. “There is a lot more that needs to be done because at this point there are so many thousands of kids who are addicted to nicotine,” said Meredith Berkman, a founder of Parents Against Vaping E-Cigarettes, which advocates for action to restrict e-cigarette access.

Trinity School in New York City, for example, plans this year to incorporate more material on e-cigarettes into its health-education program for students, said John Allman, head of school. “Parents are letting us know about this,” he said of teen use.

The Journal survey was conducted online with 1,722 participants initially, and most of the survey questions focused on 1,007 participants who said they either vape, used to vape, or know someone who vapes. Nearly three-quarters of the 1,007 participants were 17 or 18 years old; 62% were white, 21% were African-American and 18% were Hispanic. Rates of e-cigarette use are higher in older than younger teens.

A total of 501 participants said they vape: 153 regularly, and 348 occasionally. Their most common reasons for vaping were for the flavors, and because they think it’s cool. “I just enjoy the flavor and blowing really big clouds,” one participant wrote.

“It made me feel good the first time I tried it, and I got hooked,” wrote another.

When asked what they were inhaling, 71% said flavors, and 61% said nicotine.

More than two-thirds of the current vapers said they believe vaping can be part of a healthy life, though they believe there are some risks. More than half said their views of vaping had been influenced by posts on social media, an issue that has public-health experts concerned.

The percentage of respondents who said they vape is unusually high, and should be interpreted with caution, said David Abrams, a professor in the College of Global Public Health at New York University. “We can’t make too much of it,” he said, because the survey was conducted online, and the questions weren’t all asked the way they are asked on large academic or government surveys.

Measures taken by the FDA, Juul, schools and parents to limit underage access to vaping devices since this spring may also be having an effect, some experts say. “It’s possible that prevalence and use may decline over time,” said Jidong Huang, an associate professor of health management and policy at Georgia State University who studies e-cigarette use.

September, 2018|Oral Cancer News|