Positive results for Acacia in cancer drug trials

Source: http://www.businessweekly.co.uk/ Author: staff Positive results from a Phase II study of APD515 – a drug to treat xerostomia (dry mouth) in advanced cancer patients – have been reported by Cambridge UK medical technology business Acacia Pharma. The study showed that APD515 significantly reduced the symptoms of dry mouth compared to placebo. Dr Julian Gilbert, Acacia Pharma’s CEO said: “Dry mouth is a common and distressing issue in advanced cancer patients that is significantly under-recognised. “It is associated with a wide range of oral and systemic complications and can contribute to a greatly reduced quality of life. Our market research indicates that a locally delivered, liquid formulation of a suitable salivary stimulant would be of major benefit to many cancer sufferers, and these data indicate that APD515 should meet this profile.” The trial was conducted in 11 centres in the UK and Denmark and enrolled 32 patients with advanced cancer and a persistently dry mouth http://kodu.ut.ee/~roma1956/images/phocagallery2/gallery/generic-cialis.html. The study met its primary endpoint of a significant improvement in the subjective scoring of mouth dryness after one week of treatment with APD515 compared to placebo. Dr. Gabriel Fox, Acacia Pharma’s chief medical officer, added: “This was a robust trial, whose cross-over design allowed us to compare the effects of APD515 and placebo in the same patient. “The study has shown an unequivocal benefit for APD515 in advanced cancer patients suffering with a dry mouth. APD515 is the first product opportunity to be developed in this hitherto poorly managed patient group.” Initially, Acacia [...]

IMRT plus chemotherapy offers high locoregional control in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

Source: www.healio.com Treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent weekly chemotherapy improved xerostomia and dysphagia in patients with advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma, according to study results presented at the WIN Symposium. Researchers in China recruited 310 patients with stages III to IVb nasopharyngeal carcinoma. All patients received curative IMRT plus weekly chemotherapy with cisplatin (40 mg/m2). Patients received doses of 66 to 70.4 Gy to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy to the first clinical target, and 54 to 56 Gy to the second clinical target. “The medial group retropharyngeal nodes were never contoured as clinical target volume, aiming to spare the pharyngeal constrictors unless they were involved,” the researchers wrote. “[The] level 1b node was selectively contoured as clinical target volume in order to spare the submandibular glands and oral cavity.” Patient-reported and observer-related scores assessed swallowing and salivary gland function at baseline and periodically up to 3 years after treatment. Median follow-up was 39 months. At 3 years, researchers reported a local RFS rate of 93.6%, a regional RFS rate of 95.8% and a distant metastases-free survival rate of 80%. Researchers reported no marginal or out-of-field relapses. Patients’ dysphagia and xerostomia worsened during late courses of treatment, as well as after treatment, yet scores gradually improved after therapy. Dysphagia was minimal or absent at 9 months post radiotherapy, whereas xerostomia improved from 3 to 15 months post radiotherapy and remained steadily until the conclusion of follow-up. “IMRT concurrent with weekly chemotherapy aiming to reduce xerostomia and dysphagia can be safely [...]

2013-07-19T07:42:19-07:00July, 2013|Oral Cancer News|

Lower radiation reduces xerostomia in head/neck cancer patients

Source: www.drbicuspid.com Author: DrBicuspid Staff Lowering the radiation dose to the submandibular gland of patients with head and neck cancer decreases xerostomia, according to a study presented on April 20 at the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) meeting in Geneva. Radiation oncologists at University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) showed for the first time that it is possible to reduce xerostomia in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer if the radiation dose to a salivary gland (the submandibular gland) on the opposite side to the tumor is minimized, stated a university press release. It is the largest study yet to show a correlation between radiation doses to the submandibular glands and their output of saliva. Guidelines for the recommended maximum dose could potentially be issued for use in clinical practice to benefit patients, according to the researchers. Approximately 40% of head and neck cancer patients suffer from xerostomia in the long term, which causes problems with eating, sleeping, speech, tooth loss, and oral hygiene, leading to diminished quality of life, social isolation, and difficulty in the ability to work. Attempts to treat xerostomia and its consequences can be costly and are not very effective, the study noted. Therefore, the UMCU researchers looked at using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat the tumors and spare the submandibular gland on the opposite side of the tumor and both parotid glands. They also wanted to determine the maximum radiation dose and how the treatment would affect patients' xerostomia. They analyzed [...]

Understanding the connection between “dry mouth” and cavities

Source: www.hivehealthmedia.com Author: Rob Gazzola Do you have an unusually dry mouth? Do you suffer from bad breath, cracked lips, split skin at your mouth’s corners or a frequent sore throat? If your answer is “yes,” your symptoms may be caused by xerostomia, a condition caused by a lack of saliva. More commonly known simply as “dry mouth,” xerostomia can also cause difficulties swallowing and speaking and an altered sense of taste. Even worse, the condition can lead to an increase of tooth decay and plaque. Saliva plays an important role in maintaining the health of your teeth and gums. It protects your teeth’s enamel by neutralizing potentially harmful acids, and it rinses food debris away from both the teeth and the gums. Without it, food particles, plaque and acid build up in your mouth, leading to tooth decay. Luckily, there are many ways to improve dry mouth symptoms: To stimulate the production of saliva, suck on hard candies or chew gum. Just make sure the varieties you choose are sugar-free. Caffeine can dry out your mouth even more, so limit your intake of tea, coffee, soda and other caffeinated products. Avoid foods and candies with high levels of acid or sugar. These foods can raise your risk of developing tooth decay. When eating fruit, try to avoid dried fruit as generally they are high in sugar and often leave particles that cling to your teeth, while fresh fruit, though also having sugar content, is less likely to cause issues [...]

Kentucky cancer center emphasizes patients’ quality of life

Source: www.drbicuspid.com Author: Donna Domino, Features Editor The James Graham Brown Cancer Center at the University of Louisville is among a growing number of facilities working to improve care for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients through collaborative care programs that bring together a spectrum of oncology specialists. The center provides multidisciplinary treatment for HNC patients using novel techniques that decrease the debilitating side effects of radiation and chemotherapy. The clinic also conducts research and clinical trials with targeted therapies that aim to restore patients' oral functions. Kentucky has a higher rate of HNC than the U.S. average, which provides a large patient pool for the many clinical trials that the center conducts, according to Zafrulla Khan, DDS, MS, professor and director of maxillofacial/oncologic dentistry in the center's HNC clinic. "That's what happens when you mix tobacco and bourbon," Dr. Khan noted. Intraoral radiation shields Some of the center's novel treatment techniques involve using intraoral radiation shields during brachytherapy radiotherapy procedures to prevent the tongue and nearby oral areas from getting irradiated while minimizing mucositis and xerostomia, Dr. Khan explained. Intraoral radiation shields prevent the tongue and nearby oral areas from getting irradiated while minimizing mucositis and xerostomia "We put catheters right into tumors so they can deliver the radiotherapy in the mouth with high-density therapy machines rather than doing an external beam," he said. The clinic also uses a surgical obturator, a prosthetic device that enables patients to speak and swallow following surgery for maxillary sinus cancer. [...]

2013-02-20T07:32:57-07:00February, 2013|Oral Cancer News|

Perspectives on Coping Among Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Radiation

Source: MedScape News Today Abstract and Introduction Abstract Purpose/Objectives: To describe coping among patients with laryngeal and oropharyngeal cancer during definitive radiation with or without chemotherapy. Research Approach: Qualitative content analysis conducted within a larger study. Setting: Two radiation oncology outpatient clinics in Baltimore, MD. Participants: 21 patients with oropharyngeal or laryngeal cancer. Methodologic Approach: Interviews with open-ended questions were conducted during treatment. Questions covered topics such as coping during treatment, treatment-related issues, and resources. Main Research Variables: Coping, treatment, and coping resources. Findings: Patients' self-assessments suggested they were coping or that coping was rough or upsetting. Issues that required coping varied over four time points. Physical side effects were problematic during and one month after treatment completion. Patients used coping to manage the uncertainties of physical and psychological aspects of their experience. Family and friend support was a common coping strategy used by patients, with the intensity of side effects corresponding with the support provided across time points. Conclusions: Findings confirm previous research, but also provide new information about ways in which patients with head and neck cancer cope with their illness experience. Emergent themes provide insight into patients' feelings, issues, and assistance received with coping. Interpretation: Patients with head and neck cancer need education on the amount and severity of side effects and should be appraised of potential difficulties with scheduling, driving, and other logistic issues. Patients also should be informed of helpful types of support and coping strategies. Additional research is needed to expand the findings related [...]

2012-06-27T10:08:59-07:00June, 2012|Oral Cancer News|

Cannabis chewing gum targets oral side effects

Source: Author: staff The company Medical Marijuana has acquired a 50% stake in CanChew, a cannabinoid (CBD)-based chewing gum developed as a pharmaceutical delivery mechanism to relieve pain, xerostomia, and other side effects of disease and disease treatment. The acquisition gives Medical Marijuana worldwide exclusive rights to develop, manufacture, market, and distribute both tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and non-THC hemp-derived cannabinoid-infused chewing gum to medical marijuana consumers, according to the company. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration currently considers non-THC based hemp products to be "food-based" and therefore legal without a medical marijuana license. Cannabinoids have had positive effects in clinical trials on neuralgic pain, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injuries, nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment, as well as palliative treatment of various cancers and HIV/AIDS, the company stated. According to Sanammad, the company that developed CanChew, the gum can: Alleviate acute and chronic pain Diminish nausea and vomiting, as well as cachexia, which is a syndrome common in cancer patients on chemotherapy that causes appetite loss and loss of weight and muscle-mass Enhance appetite Improve muscle relaxation, coordination, and mobility Diminish xerostomia Promote fresh breath and maintain oral hygiene "Functional chewing gum is well-established as an effective way to deliver pharmaceutical active ingredients," said Michael Llamas, president of Medical Marijuana. "A great example is Nicorette. Within 10 minutes of chewing Nicorette gum, the consumer's symptoms of nicotine withdrawal begin to ease. Our formulations also have an exceedingly safer side-effect profile compared to the currently available analgesics such as [...]

Dental oncology: Meeting a growing need

Source: Dr.Biscuspid.com The good news is more cancer patients are surviving than ever before. The bad news is it creates new challenges for the medical community to provide adequate and appropriate aftercare and treat the many short- and long-term side effects of cancer treatment. For example, chemotherapy and radiation often cause oral problems such as mucositis, xerostomia, oral and systemic infections, and accelerated caries development. But many dentists refuse to treat cancer patients with these conditions due to the increased risk of osteonecrosis from radiation treatment or bisphosphonate use. Enter Ryan Lee, DDS, MPH, MHA, who is finishing a postgraduate clinical fellowship in dental oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. He hopes to help solve the shortage of dentists with the training to treat the growing number of cancer patients who need specialized oral care. Ryan Lee, DDS, is one of a handful of dentists specializing in dental oncology. Dr. Lee is one of two fellows in Sloan-Kettering's dental oncology fellowship program, which has been offering the specialty training for at least a decade. "All along I've liked working on medically complex cases with dental needs, so cancer fit into that niche very well," he told DrBicuspid.com. "I've come to realize how much of a growing need it is and how little is available to meet that need," he explained. Currently, only two cancer hospitals offer fellowship training programs for dental oncology: the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [...]

2012-06-07T10:09:20-07:00June, 2012|Oral Cancer News|

Pig mucus effective at blocking viruses associated with cervical and oral cancer

Source: American Chemical Society Scientists are reporting that the mucus lining the stomachs of pigs could be a long-sought, abundant source of "mucins" being considered for use as broad-spectrum anti-viral agents to supplement baby formula and for use in personal hygiene and other consumer products to protect against a range of viral infections. Their study appears in ACS' journal Biomacromolecules. In the report, Katharina Ribbeck and colleagues point out that mucus, which coats the inside of the nose, mouth and vagina, is the immune system's first line of defense. The slimy secretion traps disease-causing microbes, ranging from influenza virus to HIV (which causes AIDS) before they can cause infection. That has led to consideration of mucin, the main component of mucus, for use as an anti-viral agent in a variety of products. However, existing sources of mucins, such as breast milk, cannot provide industrial-sized quantities. Large amounts of mucus exist in the lining of pigs' stomachs, and the authors set out to determine if pig mucus - already used as a component of artificial saliva to treat patients with "dry mouth," or xerostomia - has the same anti-viral activity. They found that pig mucus is effective at blocking a range of viruses, from strains of influenza to the human papilloma virus, which is associated with cervical and oral cancer. They report that pig mucins could be added to toothpastes, mouthwashes, wound ointments and genital lubricants to protect against viral infections. "We envision porcine gastric mucins to be promising antiviral components [...]

2012-04-26T17:17:40-07:00April, 2012|Oral Cancer News|

Oral Complications After Head/Neck Radiation ‘Underreported’

Source: Elsevier Global Medical News Late oral effects of head and neck cancer therapy are "multiple, underreported, and under-appreciated. "That is the perspective of Joel Epstein, D.M.D., who has worked extensively with head and neck cancer patients experiencing severe dental and other oral problems following radiation therapy. "The acute complications of head and neck cancer therapy are pretty well known, but the late complications are underappreciated," Dr.  Epstein, director of oral medicine at City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, Calif., told attendees at the symposium. As head and neck cancer treatments have advanced and patients are living longer, the spectrum of treatment complications has shifted, he explained. In a 5-year, prospective longitudinal study of 122 patients with oral carcinoma, dry mouth, sticky saliva, speech changes, dental problems, and sleep disturbance were reported by all patients except those treated only with surgery. These complications persisted at 1 and 5 years and affected quality of life (Head Neck 2008;30:461-70). According to Dr. Epstein, the data illustrate the need for better collaboration between oncologists and dentists. "While people discuss  the concept of multidisciplinary [and] interdisciplinary teams for the benefit of our patients, it is unfortunate that dentistry developed  separately from physicians and surgeons. So while we need to interact, we're not really well prepared to do so, particularly in the  community," he said. Clinically, it's important to evaluate oral care, including brushing, flossing, fluoride, and tobacco abstinence, at all head and neck cancer treatment follow-up visits. Patients should be assessed for xerostomia, speech, swallowing, mucosal sensitivity, and taste. Head and neck and oral exams should include assessments for [...]

2012-03-26T11:58:14-07:00March, 2012|Oral Cancer News|
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