HPV

Italy Is Living Through What Happens When Politicians Embrace Anti-Vaxxers

Source: Huffingtonpost.com
Author: Nick Robins-Early

Italy’s Five Star movement, which was founded by a man who once called HIV a hoax, campaigned against mandatory vaccinations ahead of the country’s elections in March — and won. Last month, party leaders pushed through a law that ended compulsory immunizations for children attending public school.

The new law has made Italy the darling of the global anti-vaxxer movement. But now the country is struggling to stop a measles outbreak that has already infected thousands of people, and Europe is recording its highest number of cases in a decade — an inevitable and foreseeable result of anti-vaccine policies and rhetoric, experts say.

“Europe now is a good example of what happens when coverage of vaccinations is in decline,” said Vytenis Andriukaitis, the European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety.

The efforts of Five Star and its far-right coalition partner, the League, have particularly complicated the global campaign to combat measles, an extremely contagious virus that often spreads among children and can result in severe complications, including pneumonia and encephalitis. The World Health Organization in 2012 set the goal for Europe to eliminate the disease by 2015. Instead, an estimated 41,000 people across the continent have been infected in the first six months of this year.

Even a slight dip in a population’s vaccination rate can have disastrous effects: Countries need at least a 95 percent coverage rate to be measles-free. So when fewer people get vaccinated, kids get sick.

“We’ve got this terrible self-inflicted wound where you’re reversing public health gains in Europe and the U.S.,” said Peter Hotez, dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine.

Five Star and the League have sometimes framed their efforts to do away with compulsory immunizations as a way for parents to make their own health decisions, rather than limiting vaccinations in the country. And Luigi Di Maio, Five Star’s current party leader, has recently tried to tamp down on outright anti-vaccine conspiracies.

But the rhetoric and proposals of other prominent party figures and their allies are much more radical. One top Five Star official, Paola Taverna, last month backed hazardous “measles parties” where children gather to infect each other and build up immunity. League party leader Matteo Salvini described mandatory vaccinations as “useless and in many cases dangerous” in June. Some party candidates and top officials went further, falsely claiming vaccines cause autism and referring to state-funded vaccination as “free genocide.”

These politicians’ rhetoric is in line with anti-vaccine groups that couch conspiracies and opposition to vaccinations in appeals to personal choice and pseudoscience. “They use these phony terms that really have no meaning … like medical freedom and vaccine choice,” Hotez said. “What these [anti-vaccine] groups are really doing is depriving children of fundamental rights.”

In a little over three months in office, Five Star and the League have furthered the goals of a small but vocal anti-vaccine community.

Just a year ago, Italy looked like it was on a path to solving its measles outbreak. The country’s previous government passed a law that required children to receive 10 vaccinations in order to attend state-run schools.

The law received the backing from infectious disease experts from the World Health Organization and Italian doctors, but was fiercely opposed by Europe’s well-organized anti-vaccine movement.

“It’s quantitatively a very small group, but qualitatively they are noisy and very, very aggressive,” said Walter Ricciardi, president of the Italian National Institute of Health.

Anti-vaccine protesters attacked government deputies outside of the Italian parliament. They held rallies in the streets of Rome. A group of 130 families wrote to Italy’s president claiming they would seek asylum in Austria to avoid the vaccinations. At one of Health Minister Beatrice Lorenzin’s events promoting her book, activists screamed accusations that she was killing children.

Prominent international anti-vaxxer organizations, a network made up of activists and even some disgraced doctors, latched on to Italy as a symbol of resistance, and posts on anti-vaxx forums lauded the demonstrations. The League and Five Star parties capitalized on the unrest and criticized the law as government overreach.

“The law was good and it was working, then the major leaders of the two parties made unscientific comments on vaccines,” Ricciardi said.

Stopping the outbreak became less important to Five Star and the League than appealing to the anti-establishment sentiment that ushered the parties into power, critics allege.

“They wanted the votes of anti-vaxxers and people that consider the law of compulsory vaccination a violation of personal freedom,” said Stefano Zona, a doctor of infectious diseases and member of IoVaccino, an Italian nonprofit that seeks to correct misinformation around vaccines.

“They are feeding the anti-vaxxer movement,” he said.

The U.S. has also had several major measles outbreaks in recent years, in part driven by anti-vaccine activists and linked to lower vaccination rates in some communities. And American politicians aren’t much more restrained than their Italian counterparts in fueling vaccine skepticism. President Donald Trump questioned the safety of vaccines during a 2015 Republican presidential debate and spent years promoting anti-vaxxer conspiracies.

September, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Study: HPV cancer survivors at risk for second HPV cancer

Source: www.bcm.edu
Author: Dipali Pathak

A retrospective study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health found that survivors of HPV-associated cancers have a high incidence of developing second HPV-related cancers. Their findings, which were reported today in JAMA Network Open, suggest the need for increased screening for HPV-associated precancerous and early cancerous lesions among people who are survivors of the disease.

Human papillomavirus, or HPV, is a sexually transmitted infection that can lead to gynecological (cervical, vaginal and vulvar), anogenital (anal and penile) and oropharyngeal (throat and mouth) cancers. Cervical cancer is the most common HPV-associated cancer in women, and oropharyngeal cancers are the most common in men.

“HPV is a virally mediated cancer, so it makes sense if somebody is infected in one site with the virus that they would be infected in other sites as well. It is important for people who have had one HPV-related cancer to know that they are at increased risk for HPV-related cancers in another site, and they are encouraged to have screening for these other cancers, if screening is available. Currently, screening is available for cervical and anal precancers,” said Dr. Elizabeth Chiao, professor of medicine in the section of infectious diseases at Baylor and with the Houston VA Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety.

Chiao also is a member of the NCI-designated Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center at Baylor College of Medicine.

For the study, researchers used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program database, which collects cancer incidence data from registries across the United States. They identified survivors of HPV-associated cancers diagnosed from January 1973 to December 2014 and looked at patients who developed a second primary HPV-associated cancer at the same site or a different site at least two months after the diagnosis.

They found that individuals who had primary HPV-related cancer had an increased risk of HPV-related cancer in other sites later in life.

According to the study, the risk for most types of second primary HPV-associated cancers is high after 1) initial vaginal and vulvar cancers in women, 2) after initial penile cancer in men and 3) after anal cancer in both women and men. The researchers found no association with secondary non-HPV associated cancers.

“Future research needs to be prioritized to determine effective as well as cost-effective ways to screen for HPV-associated second cancers in this high-risk group,” said Dr. Ashish Deshmukh, assistant professor in the department of management, policy and community health at UTHealth School of Public Health in Houston.

The researchers recommend investigating the efficacy of screening and prevention measures for survivors of HPV-associated cancers. They also recommend being vaccinated against HPV. The vaccination series can begin at 9 years of age in males and females and can go through age 26 for females and age 21 in males.

Others who took part in the study include Ryan Suk and Dr. Kalyani Sonawane with UTHealth School of Public Health; Dr. Parag Mahale with the National Cancer Institute; Dr. Andrew G. Sikora with Baylor College of Medicine; Dr. Jagpreet Chhatwal with Harvard Medical School; Dr. Kathleen Schmeler and Dr. Scott B. Cantor with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Dr. Keith Sigel with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Note: This work was supported by grants K07180782 and R01 CA163103 from the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.

September, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Head and neck cancer: An overview of head and neck cancer

Source: www.curetoday.com
Author: staff

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S, and Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc., board members of the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance, discuss the prevalence of cancers of the head and neck, emphasizing the potential risk factors and importance of prevention.

Transcript:
Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: Welcome to this CURE Connections® program titled “Head and Neck Cancer: Through the Eyes of a Patient.” I’m Meryl Kaufman, a certified speech-language pathologist and founder of Georgia Speech and Swallowing LLC. I am joined today by Dr. Itzhak Brook, a professor of pediatrics and medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine, who was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2006. Together we will discuss the prevalence of head and neck cancer, what unique challenges patients may face and how one can adjust to life after receiving treatment for their disease. Dr. Brook and I also serve as board members on the Head and Cancer Alliance.

Dr. Brook, let’s talk about head and neck cancer in general. What’s the difference between head and neck cancer associated with the traditional risk factors, such as smoking and drinking, and HPV-related head and neck cancers?

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: The traditional head and neck cancer is related to smoking and alcohol consumption. It’s usually associated with a high rate of laryngeal cancer. And HPV-related cancer is a relatively new arrival on the scene of head and neck cancer, and it’s associated with a condition of infection by a venereal disease. The virus HPV is usually associated with a posterior tongue cancer or an oropharyngeal cancer.

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: Exactly, yes. So the HPV viruses typically in the oropharynx, the tonsil and the tongue basis are certainly rising in incidence as compared with the traditional head and neck cancers, which are decreasing in incidence. In fact, it’s anticipated that in the year 2020, the HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers are going to surpass HPV-related cervical cancers, which are typically what you think of with the HPV virus. So that is a new patient population, but the good news is that the survival rates are better for the HPV-related head and neck cancers versus the non-HPV-related cancers. Can you speak a little bit about the incidence of the two?

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: The incidence of head and neck cancer is not as high as others like colon cancer, breast cancer in women or lung cancer, but it’s around the ninth or 10th cause of cancer in the world in this country. In countries where there is smoking and alcohol consumption, it’s a higher rate. HPV is usually happening in younger people, in the late 30s or early 40s. And fortunately, we hope that it could be prevented by vaccination. Although it’s approved that it can, it’s not yet available because the incubation period for the cancer, as you may call it, takes 20, 30 years, so we don’t really know. Fortunately, even though HPV is very common, the occurrence of HPV-related cancer is very, very rare.

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: Correct. In terms of the vaccination for the HPV virus, I agree, the proof certainly isn’t definitively out there yet, but the vaccine protects against the strain of virus that ultimately can lead to head and neck cancer. So the thought is that by preventing the contraction of the virus, hopefully we can also prevent these head and neck cancers, which is why the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recommend that children between the ages of 11 and 12, female and males, are vaccinated prior to sexual debut in the hopes of preventing these cancers down the road, certainly. So yes, head and neck cancer does account for about 6 percent of all cancers worldwide, with about 500,000 cases worldwide. And in the United States, we anticipate about 65,000 a year, I believe, and they do occur more frequently in men, almost twice as often in men than in women and typically in people over the age of 50 in the traditional head and neck cancers. But certainly, there is a change in that with the introduction of the HPV-related cancers. Can you talk a little bit about prevention in terms of things that we can do to prevent the risky behaviors?

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: Of course, with the traditional cancers, it can be prevented by not smoking or drinking alcohol in high quantities. But there’s the behavioral changes that men and women can change that can reduce the risk of acquiring it. It’s a sexually transmitted disease. Oral sex has been the No. 1 cause, so you think of condoms or men using them also when having oral sex may prevent it.

September, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Head and neck cancer: Getting a diagnosis of head and neck cancer

Source: www.curetoday.com
Author: staff

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S, and Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc., board members of the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance, discuss which symptoms should lead one to seek a diagnosis of head and neck cancer and which tests are available to aid in evaluation.

Transcript:
Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: When we talk about the HPV-related cancers, those are primarily in the oropharynx, which is the tongue base and the tonsil. But the traditional cancers typically can also involve the tongue, the lips, the floor of the mouth, the jaw, the gums and the hard palate. And the pharynx; that includes the nasopharynx behind the nose. We’ve addressed the oropharynx but also the hypopharynx, near the larynx. And in your case, laryngeal cancer that involves the larynx, the voice box, and the epiglottis. So, head and neck cancers can occur in any of those places. Can you talk about some of the signs and symptoms people can look out for in those areas?

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: Well, the important signs that are common to oral cancers are having a sore throat, a feeling that you cannot swallow and difficulty in swallowing. In advanced stages, it can interfere with breathing. If you have increased lymph glands in the neck and are also feeling like a lump or something is stuck in your mouth, those could be a sign. Sometimes they have symptoms such as pain in the ear or pain in the throat. And there are specific cancers such as sinuses and lips. If there is an area of the mouth where there’s a red or ulcerating lesion in the oropharynx, this can indicate that there is a cancer risk.

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: Exactly. Can you talk about your initial presentation? What symptoms did you experience?

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: I experienced something stuck in my mouth, and when it didn’t go away after a week or so, I went to see my doctors, and they discovered it very early. And I was fortunate that it was possible to remove it by a simple biopsy. And then, unfortunately for me, even though I got radiation, the cancer came back about a year and a half later, and I required a laryngectomy to remove the cancer because it had moved to other places, the throat. And that was a way to treat it initially, but being vigilant and recognizing early that there’s something wrong, something is happening, can definitely save many lives.

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: Exactly. And quality of life, right?

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: Right.

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: What were some of the tests exactly that you underwent in trying to find this cancer and making a diagnosis?

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: Well, I got obviously the most important thing, which was to have a good otolaryngological examination with endoscopy, where they put the tube into your throat or through the nose to try to detect and see what’s going on through direct examination. The other tests that I am aware of are MRI and then CT. But the most important thing in my case was a good physical examination because in my case, the MRI and CT didn’t show anything wrong because you need the cancer to be larger than about a half an inch, and mine wasn’t yet. So, seeing your doctor is the most important thing a person can do to catch the cancer early.

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: Absolutely. And one of the things the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance does and promotes is free screenings throughout the country and throughout the world. And traditionally, the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance has done that during oral head and neck cancer awareness week, which occurs in April every year. But there has been a push in the past couple of years to really spread that out throughout the year and help raise awareness to these signs and symptoms that you addressed, as well as direct patients to facilities that can provide a screening. And a screening is simple and easy, and it does involve a physical examination—feeling the neck, looking for signs and symptoms and talking about signs and symptoms. So. certainly, if any listeners were to identify any of these risk factors that you address, such as a change in swallowing, a change in voice, a lump in the neck, pain in the ear or difficulty breathing, then certainly looking to some of these screening sites or reaching out to your doctor is a good way to really find those cancers early and help minimize the intensity of the treatment that might result.

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: Absolutely.

Meryl Kaufman, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, BRS-S: Yes. And in terms of staging head and neck cancers, one of the important pieces of that work-up when you had the endoscopy and the scans was to come up with a TNM stage for that head and neck cancer that really kind of directs the treatment. Part of that also is being evaluated by a multidisciplinary team, and I think it’s really important in the management of head and neck cancer that there are multiple specialists, including the otolaryngologist, who’s often the first person to make the diagnosis. But a team of specialists, including radiation oncologists, hematology, oncology, speech pathology, nutrition, social work and pathology—there are so many professionals involved. Was there a multidisciplinary team involved in your care?

Itzhak Brook, M.D., M.Sc.: Yes. Fortunately, I had been examined by all those experts. In addition to it, I also, when I finally had the laryngectomy, met and represented several patients who wanted and got that procedure, and meeting them prepared me more than anything else in our life for what a laryngectomy would be.

September, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

DCD: Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma now and most common HPV associated with cancer

In 2015, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma surpassed cervical cancer as the most common HPV-associated cancer in the U.S., with 15,479 cases among men and 3,438 cases among women, according to data from the CDC published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

The report also showed that rates of HPV-related anal squamous cell carcinoma and vulvar cancer increased over the past 15 years, whereas rates of HPV-related cervical cancer and vaginal squamous cell carcinoma decreased.

“Although smoking is a risk factor for oropharyngeal cancers, smoking rates have been declining in the United States, and studies have indicated that the increase in oropharyngeal cancer is attributable to HPV,” Elizabeth A. Van Dyne, MD, epidemic intelligence services officer in division of cancer prevention and control at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion of the CDC, and colleagues wrote.

“In contrast to cervical cancer, there currently is no U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended screening for other HPV-associated cancers,” they added.

The trends in HPV-related cancers report included data from 1999 to 2015 from cancer registries — CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries and NCI’s SEER program — covering 97.8% of the U.S. population.

The CDC reported 30,115 new cases of HPV-associated cancers in 1999 compared with 43,371 new cases in 2015.

During the study period, researchers observed a 2.7% increase in rates of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma among men and a 0.8% increase among women. Rates of anal squamous cell carcinoma increased by 2.1% among men and 2.9% among women.

Among women, researchers observed a 1.6% decrease in HPV-related cervical cancer and a 0.6% decrease in rates of HPV-related vaginal squamous cell carcinoma. Rates of vulvar squamous cell carcinoma increased by 1.3%.

Rates of penile squamous cell carcinoma remained stable from 1999 to 2015.

Overall, rates of HPV-related cancers varied by age and race/ethnicity.

Researchers observed a 4% increase in the rate of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma among men aged 60 to 69 years compared with a 0.8% increase among men aged 40 to 49 years.

For anal squamous cell carcinoma, the largest increases occurred among women aged 50 to 69 years (4.6% to 4.8%) and men aged 50 to 59 years (4%).

Several factors contribute to the increased incidence of oropharyngeal and anal squamous cell carcinomas, including changes in sexual behavior.

“Unprotected oral sex and receptive anal sex are risk factors for HPV infection,” the researchers wrote. “White men have the highest number of lifetime oral sex partners and report first performing oral sex at a younger age compared with other racial/ethnic groups; these risk factors could be contributing to a higher rate of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma among white men than other racial/ethnic groups.”

Cervical cancer rates remained stable among women aged 35 to 39 years; however, younger and older woman demonstrated decreases ranging from 1.2% to 4.2%.

Cervical carcinoma rates decreased across all racial/ethnic groups, although decreases appeared more prominent among Hispanics than non-Hispanics (3.4% vs. 1.5%).

“The decline in cervical cancer from 1999 to 2015 represents a continued trend since the 1950s as a result of cancer screening,” the researchers wrote. “Rates of cervical carcinoma in this report decreased more among Hispanics, American Indian/Alaska Natives and blacks than other groups; however, incidence rates were still higher among Hispanics and blacks than among whites in 2015. These persistent disparities in incidence suggest that health care delivery needs of some groups are not fully met.”

The limitations of the report included the fact that the cancer registries do not routinely determine the HPV status of cancers and that race/ethnicity data was derived from medical records.

“Further research to understand the progression from HPV infection to oropharyngeal cancer would be beneficial,” the researchers wrote. “Continued surveillance through high-quality registries is important to monitor changes in HPV-associated cancer incidence.” – by Cassie Homer

August, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Study: Cetuximab, radiation inferior to standard HPV throat cancer treatment

Source: upi.com
Author: Allen Cone

Treating HPV-positive throat cancer with cetuximab and radiation had worse overall and progression-free survival results compared with the current method of treatment with radiation and cisplatin, the National Institutes of Health revealed Tuesday.

The trial, which was funded by the National Cancer Institute, was intended to test whether the combination would be less toxic than cisplatin but be just as effective for human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal cancer. The trial, which began in 2011, enrolled 849 patients at least 18 years old with the cancer to receive cetuximab or cisplatin with radiation. The trial is expected to finish in 2020.

Cetuximab, which is manufactured under the brand name Erbitux by Eli Lilly, and cisplatin, which as sold as Platinol by Pfizer, are used in chemotherapy.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration had approved cetuximab with radiation for patients with head and neck cancer, including oropharyngeal cancer.

HPV, which is transmitted through intimate skin-to-skin contact, is the leading cause of oropharynx cancers, which are the throat at the back of the mouth, including the soft palate, the base of the tongue and the tonsils. Most people at risk are white, non-smoking males age 35 to 55 — including a 4-to-1 male ratio over females — according to The Oral Cancer Foundation.

The NIH released the trial results after an interim analysis showed that cetuximab with radiation wasn’t as effective.

In a median follow-up of 4.5 years, the test combination was found to be “significantly inferior” to the cisplatin method.

“Clinical trials designed to test less toxic treatment strategies for patients without compromising clinical benefit are a very important area of interest for NCI and the cancer research community,” said Dr. Shakun Malik, of NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis.

Toxic side effects were different, with adverse events of renal toxicity, hearing loss and bone marrow suppression more common in patients in the cisplatin group and body rash more frequent in the cetuximab method.

For patients who cannot tolerate cisplatin, cetuximab with radiation is an accepted standard of care.

“The goal of this trial was to find an alternative to cisplatin that would be as effective at controlling the cancer, but with fewer side effects,” lead investigator Dr. Andy Trotti, of the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., said in a press release. “We were surprised by the loss of tumor control with cetuximab.”

August, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

The surge in throat cancer, especially in men

Source: newswise.com
Author: UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

Humanpapilloma virus (HPV) is now the leading cause of certain types of throat cancer. Dr. Michael Moore, director of head and neck surgery at UC Davis and an HPV-related cancer expert, answers some tough questions about the trend and what can be done about it.

Q: What is HPV and how is it related to head and neck cancers?

A: There are about 150 different types of HPV, but HPV 16 is the one that most frequently causes cancers that affect the tissue in the oropharynx, which includes back of the throat, soft palate, tonsils and the back or base of the tongue. You can get non-cancerous lesions from other types of HPV that look like warts in the nose, mouth or throat, called papillomas. Some can develop in childhood just from exposure early in life. Some develop later in life and only occasionally turn into cancer.

Q: How do you get HPV?

A: HPV can spread from mother to her baby around the time of delivery. It also spreads through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex, and even open-mouth kissing. Some people have been found to be infected without an obvious cause.

Q: How does HPV cause cancer?

A: Most people who are infected clear the virus on their own. In a small group of people it hangs around and causes a persistent infection. Around 1% of US adults have a persistent HPV 16 infection, and in a small subset of these individuals the DNA of the virus incorporates itself into the DNA of the person infected and can start to make proteins that then predispose that person to developing cancer.

Q: How prevalent are HPV-related throat cancers?

A: Traditionally, the risk factors for head and neck cancers were tobacco and alcohol use, but over the last 20 or 30 years we found the rates of those cancers going down because smoking rates have gone down. Meanwhile, the incidence of head and neck cancers related to HPV has gone up more than 200 percent over this time period. This increase has been so dramatic that HPV-related throat cancer has recently surpassed cervical cancer as the most common HPV-related cancer in the United States.

Q: Why are the rates going up?

A: Unlike with cervical cancer, in which the PAP smear is highly effective at finding potentially cancerous or pre-cancerous cells, there is no good screening test for these head and neck cancers. Currently, the use of swab tests for HPV is effective in finding out if you have an HPV infection, but not in determining if the infection will be persistent or if you will ever develop cancer. As a result, such tests are not endorsed as a way to screen for these tumors.

Q: Do both men and women get thee cancers?

A: Men are four times more likely to be diagnosed with an HPV-related head and neck cancer. Researchers don’t yet know why. It may have to do with sexual practices or related to the types of exposure they receive. The local or systemic immune system may also play a role.

Q: Can HPV-related head and neck cancers be prevented?

A: We have a very effective vaccine against HPV, and we know the vaccine can prevent oral HPV infections. In fact, studies have shown that the vaccine is 93 percent effective in preventing the oral infections that cause head and neck cancers. We recommend two injections for adolescents under age 15 and three for those over 15. The vaccine is recommended for children age 10-11, but vaccination can start in children as young as age 9, and in boys as late as age 21 and in girls as late as 26. It is also important to maintain safe sexual practices and avoid other potentially cancer-causing exposures such as tobacco, alcohol and marijuana.

Q: What are the main barriers to vaccination?

A: Studies have shown that the biggest reason kids don’t get it is lack of physician endorsement or recommendation. The American Cancer Society is trying to change that, asking physicians to introduce it to parents when they discuss other adolescent vaccines. There has also been concern that parents aren’t comfortable talking about sexuality with their children, and some have worried that if the child gets the vaccine they are more likely to be sexually active. That theory has been debunked in scientific studies.

Q: How safe and effective is the HPV vaccine?

A: It has a very safe track record and is continually undergoing evaluation to look for potential side effects. While there are some risks with any vaccine, one of the most common side effects is that patients may feel light headed after being vaccinated, and it is recommended they are observed for 15 minutes afterward.

August, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

The UK will give boys cancer-preventing HPV vaccine

Source: www.care2.com
Author: Steve Williams

The UK has announced that, after a great deal of pressure, it will be making the HPV vaccine available to teenage boys, potentially protecting them from a number of cancers.

The vaccine is routinely offered to teenage girls in schools. It has shown an impressive safety record while at the same time driving down cervical, oral and throat cancer rates by protecting young women from sexually transmitted HPV.

Campaigners have long said that teenage boys should also be provided the vaccine, because evidence has shown the HPV vaccine can reduce rates of oral, throat, penile and anal cancers. Unfortunately, Public Health England has taken some convincing on this issue, with a cash-strapped National Health Service having to make sure that every investment more than pays its way.

Now, the government says it believes the cost is far outweighed by the public health benefit.

Dr. Mary Ramsay, Head of Immunisations at Public Health England, is quoted as saying, “This extended programme offers us the opportunity to make HPV related diseases a thing of the past and build on the success of the girls’ programme, which has already reduced the prevalence of HPV 16 and 18, the main cancer-causing types, by over 80 percent.”

This change of course comes after the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation said earlier this month that, after careful review, it believed the HPV vaccination program should be extended to boys, as it found “gender-neutral vaccination is highly likely to be cost effective”.

HPV VACCINE’S SAFETY RECORD IS OVERWHELMING
While there have been some scare stories in the media relating to supposed side-effects from HPV vaccine, it’s important to note that the actual safety record for HPV vaccination is overwhelmingly good.

In fact, a meta-analysis of studies involving over 70,000 women demonstrated that of the 14 deaths per 10,000 that occurred around the time of vaccination, not a single one could be directly linked to the vaccine.

Like every live vaccine, there is the potential for some side effects. HPV vaccine’s side-effects are, for the most part, mild. If a person does have an adverse reaction, it is likely to manifest in localized swelling, a rash, or feelings of fatigue or nausea — all of which will subside on their own within a day or two.

Again, like any medication, there is the potential for more serious side-effects. However, for the HPV vaccine the chances of this happening are incredibly low. The NHS puts it at less than one out of every million cases for reactions like anaphylaxis.

Ah, but aren’t there studies linking HPV to various conditions like fibromyalgia? There have been such small-scale studies. None have found a convincing link, and their size and quality pale in comparison to the data we have to support that, for most women, the vaccine is safe and effective.

It may well be that for a tiny minority of people, the vaccine could present a risk, but that possibility is neither confirmed nor does it outweigh the manifest benefit. The HPV vaccine is thought to save thousands of lives per year globally by preventing cervical cancer deaths.

In short, the weight of not just national but global evidence points to the HPV vaccine saving lives and doing so safely.

WHY THIS MOVE WILL PROTECT GIRLS AS WELL AS BOYS
The fact that the vaccine will protect boys from cancer is, for many, motivation enough to say that the vaccine should be provided to teenage boys.

However, in addition to that, protecting boys from HPV has a knock-on effect for girls. That’s because it cuts down the circulating HPV strains that cause cancer for young women. This means that those young woman who cannot have the vaccine due to their medical history or current conditions will benefit from herd immunity.

It’s estimated that HPV16 and HPV18 circulation has already gone down by 80 percent in the UK as a result of the vaccination program.

In this way, not only are we seeking to eradicate the incredibly common HPV strains, we are also helping to cut our children’s cancer risk. The UK is among the first group of nations to offer the HPV vaccine to both girls and boys, and it is hoped that other nations will follow.

HPV: The gender-neutral killer in need of prevention among men

Source: CNN
Author: Dominic Rech

In July 2014, Phil Rech, then 59, was diagnosed with tonsil cancer.

“I had got a lump in my neck. I had the tonsils out, and within the next few days, I was having radical neck dissection,” he said. “Then I had six weeks of intensive, targeted radiotherapy. The burning effect towards the end of the treatment became very painful.”

The therapy involved a radiotherapy mask, molded to the shape of his face, that went over his head as radiotherapy was beamed in, targeting the cancer.

The discovery of his cancer not only startled him, it startled everyone who knew him.
Phil is my dad, and to our family, he had always been healthy: He doesn’t smoke, he rarely drinks alcohol, and he generally stays fairly fit.

But that’s not how cancer works.

At the time of the diagnosis, Phil didn’t question how or what could have caused his cancer, as he focused on getting better.

Like many men in the UK and around the world, he wasn’t aware of a group of viruses that were a threat, human papillomavirus or HPV, which were eventually connected to his cancer.

“To discover it was linked to HPV was a massive shock,” he said. “There was a lot of speculation over what could have caused it. To discover it was that, was certainly a surprise. I didn’t really know it was a threat to me.”

A cancerous virus

HPV is a group of 150 related viruses that can be transmitted through any form of sexual contact, whether kissing or intercourse. In most cases, the human body will get rid of it naturally, but certain high-risk types can develop into things like genital warts and cancers, including cervical, anal and throat.

But there is a vaccine, and how it works is pretty simple. It’s a mimic of the virus particle; when administered into someone’s muscle, it creates many more antibodies than a natural infection would, according to John Doorbar, professor of viral pathogenesis at Cambridge University.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “almost every person who is sexually active will get HPV at some time in their life if they don’t get the HPV vaccine.”

The vaccine needs to be given before a person is exposed to HPV. Its effectiveness in terms of preventing infections is well-known — 100% in some studies — but who gets it is a question of debate around the globe, particularly in the UK.

In the UK, girls ages 12 to 13 are routinely offered the first HPV vaccination. They can get the vaccine for free via the National Health Service from ages 12 to 18. This is encouraged to help combat cervical cancer, which a recent report suggests it has done globally.

In England, between 2010 and 2016, infections with HPV 16 and 18 (two types of the virus responsible for most cervical cancer cases) fell 86% among women 16 to 21 who were eligible for the vaccine during this period, Public Health England found.

But what about men?

Until now, some experts in the UK have argued that men would ultimately be protected against the virus through “herd immunity”: As long as girls are well-protected, the male population should be shielded, too.

But according to the Royal Society of Public Health, which supports providing the vaccine to boys, uptake of the vaccine for girls is insufficiently high to ensure herd immunity in several areas of the UK. Men are still at risk of acquiring HPV from sexual contact with women from countries without a vaccination program, the society said.

In April, NHS England and Public Health England, on recommendation from the UK’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, decided to introduce the vaccine to men 45 or younger who have sex with other men, often called MSM, after concluding that this group does not benefit from herd immunity.

Historically, heterosexual men and young boys have not been offered it through the NHS but can pay to receive it privately. Pharmacies including Boots, Lloyds and Superdrug in the UK charge about 150 pounds ($196) per dose, with people typically needing two or three doses.

But on July 18, the vaccination committee recommended extending the HPV immunization program to boys after it reviewed the evidence for vaccinating boys since 2013. A recommendation last year concluded it was still not cost-effective to vaccinate this group, but experts and campaigners appealed for the committee to look again — and their stance changed.

“It is clear that a programme to vaccinate adolescent males would provide those vaccinated with direct protection against HPV infection, and associated disease including anogenital warts, anal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers,” the statement says. The committee confirmed that evidence has strengthened on the association of HPV with non-cervical cancers, which affect men as well as women, and that vaccination is efficacious in preventing these other HPV-related cancers.

In response to the recommendation, the same day, the Scottish government announced that it would implement a vaccination program to boys as soon as it practically could, Public Health Minister Joe FitzPatrick said. Wales also opted to roll out the vaccine to boys.

The question remaining is whether England will follow suit.

There is some disparity over the number of other countries vaccinating boys against HPV. Shirley Cramer, chief executive of the Royal Society of Public Health, said 20 countries vaccinate boys, while the HPV Action partnership says that about 15 roll it out to boys as well as girls.

The vaccine has been approved for males in the United States for almost 10 years. Italy and Australia are also pioneering gender-neutral vaccination plans.

Lagging behind and increasing rates

In 2017, after being in remission for three years, Phil’s cancer surfaced again — this time, in the brain and the lungs.

“I started to feel some funny fluttery feelings in my chest,” he said. “It was only my oncologist, who revealed to me that I had six small lesions on my lungs. An MRI scan also showed three on my brain.

“That’s the nature of cancer. It’s a crafty disease,” he said.

A 2017 study found that one in nine American men is infected with the oral form of HPV. Nationwide, rates for oral HPV infections are 11.5% of men and 3.2% of women: 11 million men, compared with 3.2 million women, the researchers estimated.

Among HPV-related cancers, a type of head and neck cancer called oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma was far more likely to strike men in the US, the same study found, with its incidence surpassing cervical cancer among women. Men who have had multiple sex partners, men who reported having sex with men and men with genital HPV infections were found to have the highest rates of oral HPV.

But in the UK, the discussion around vaccinating boys has been ongoing. In less than 10 years, admissions for primary cancerous tumors of the head and neck increased by almost 10,000, according to the NHS, from 29,198 in 2008-09 to 37,417 in 2016-17.

A recent review by the nonprofit medical research group Cochrane acknowledged that HPV was not only linked to cervical cancers, it increases risk of vulval cancers, penile cancers and some head and neck cancers. But the review also said that these cancers were rarer and that ascertaining the effects of vaccination on them may require the evaluation of non-randomized, population-level evidence over many years.

Beyond the price tag

“The problem is cost-effectiveness, and that is why the government hadn’t made a decision to vaccinate boys in this country,” said Jo Morrison, co-ordinating editor for the Cochrane Gynae, Neuro and Orphan Cancer Group.

However, she added, “doctors and other informed people are looking to get their boys vaccinated.”

Giampiero Favato is one of them. “Twenty years from now, we will laugh about this discussion,” said the health economics specialist at Kingston University. “It is obvious we should vaccinate boys. HPV is a gender-neutral killer. When my son is 12, I will pay for the vaccination if necessary.”

He is skeptical of “herd immunity” and giving the vaccine only to girls: “The current models are not capable of replicating the sexual behavior and preference in the normal population. Most of the models are based on the assumption that sex is only happening between fully heterosexual couples and their partnerships.”

This of course would mean more money for the NHS, but Favato says “price is not the issue,” and the private cost of the vaccine is unlikely be anywhere near that for the NHS, which is likely to get it at a competitive rate. “In Italy, the vaccination costs about $30 to $32 per vial.”

But Helen Bedford, professor of children’s health at the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, added that cost-effectiveness still needs to be taken into account and that the method of calculating this is what ultimately needs to change.

“In view of the long interval between infection with HPV and development of disease, [the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation] are supportive of changing the methods for calculating cost effectiveness to consider HPV vaccine for boys,” she said. “A review of cost-effectiveness modeling is soon to be concluded, and this is one of the issues that is being considered as part of that review.”

Phil said that if he could have had the vaccine readily available when he was younger, he would have taken it.

He continues to fight his cancer today, but cases like his are increasing amid the discourse on HPV vaccination rollouts in the UK.

“I would urge all boys to be vaccinated as a matter of course,” he said. “We have long vaccinated against the likes of polio, measles, mumps and rubella. HPV is just as serious and life-threatening as any of these.”

Note from OCF: We are one of the first supporters and donors to the HPV Action Partnership that originally supported research and early perception of the concept of boys being vaccinated for herd immunization. This has been a long term endeavor and a labor of love.  Men get oral cancers more than woman do and we want to inform that the HPV Vaccine goes beyond protecting from cervical cancers; it also protects from anal, penile and oropharyngeal cancer.

 

July, 2018|OCF In The News|

Changes in cancer staging: what you should know

Source: health.clevelandclinic.org
Author: staff

When you learn you have cancer, you want to know what to expect: How will doctors treat your illness? How effective is treatment likely to be?

Much depends on the way doctors first classify, or “stage,” your cancer, using the official staging manual from the American Joint Committee on Cancer. Staging guidelines continue to evolve as knowledge about individual tumor growth and innovative technologies come into play.

An ever-evolving system
“Historically, we staged cancers according to tumor size, lymph node involvement and the presence of metastases,” says oncologist Dale Shepard, MD, PhD.

“The latest staging manual incorporates new findings on the importance of changes in molecular DNA and tumor genomic profiling. This will affect many patients going forward.”

Among those most impacted by changes in staging are people newly diagnosed with breast cancer; head and neck cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV); or sarcoma.

How staging works
“Staging allows us to stratify patients into groups based on anatomic and other criteria. It gives us a framework for understanding the extent of disease,” Dr. Shepard explains.

Cancers are staged clinically and pathologically:

  • The clinical stage is determined during the initial workup for cancer.
  • The pathologic stage is determined by studying a surgically removed tumor sample under the microscope.

Adds Tumor Registry Manager Kate Tullio, MPH, MS, “Staging helps physicians and other researchers to compare patients with the same types of cancer to each other in a consistent way — so that we might learn more about these cancers and how to effectively treat them.”

Staging allows doctors to determine the best course of treatment for different types of cancer and helps families to understand the prognosis, or likely outcome, of that treatment.

It also allows doctors to offer patients a chance to participate in clinical trials of new therapies targeting their form of cancer.

The impact of DNA changes on breast cancer
In the past, most breast cancer patients with lymph node involvement were automatically classified as stage II or higher, and were often given chemotherapy.

“Previously, physicians considered only tumor size, lymph node involvement and spread of the cancer to distant areas of the body when staging breast cancer,” says Ms. Tullio.

Today, staging has improved with the addition of advanced multi-gene panel testing and specific information on the biology of the tumor.

“This incorporates what we have found clinically: that some patients previously identified with stage II breast cancer did better than others,” says Dr. Shepard. “In essence, patients with HER2-positive disease were more like patients with stage I disease.”

HPV’s effect on head and neck cancers
The classification of head and neck tumors has changed because of advances in genomic profiling.

“We now have a separate system for classifying head and neck cancer caused by HPV infection because we realize that, clinically, it is a different disease,” says Dr. Shepard.

Ms. Tullio notes that patients with head and neck cancers caused by HPV have a better prognosis — living longer, on average, than head and neck cancer patients without HPV.

“Patients with HPV-positive mouth or throat cancers usually respond well to treatment and may need less aggressive therapy than those who are HPV-negative,” she says.

Also new, adds Dr. Shepard, are separate classification systems for soft-tissue cancers called sarcomas. Doctors have found that, based on the primary tumor’s location, sarcomas will behave and respond to treatment differently.

How will these changes affect you?
The impact of these staging changes will be far greater for patients with cancers diagnosed on or after Jan. 1, 2018.

“If your cancer is new, then changes in classification may affect early decisions about your initial care and likely prognosis,” says Dr. Shepard.

If you received a cancer diagnosis before that date, the stage of your tumor will not change, Ms. Tullio notes. However, new data in the manual may allow your doctors to better assess and treat you.

Adds Dr. Shepard, “Talk to your doctor if you have any questions about the new staging systems. It’s important to be sure all the right tests are ordered to accurately assess your cancer.”