tongue cancer

Possible marker for recurring HPV-linked oropharyngeal cancers

Author: John Hopkins Media Contact: Vanessa Wasta

A look-back analysis of HPV infection antibodies in patients treated for oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancers linked to HPV infection suggests at least one of the antibodies could be useful in identifying those at risk for a recurrence of the cancer, say scientists at The Johns Hopkins University. A report on the study is published in the February issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

HPV infections, which are virtually all sexually transmitted, are responsible for the recent rise in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, according to the National Cancer Institute, and now account for about 80 percent of these cancers.

People with HPV-positive tumors of the throat, base of the tongue and tonsils have higher overall survival rates compared to people with similar tumors not caused by HPV, but studies show that more than 25 percent of HPV-positive cancers recur–usually within the first two years after treatment.

“There are currently no reliable tests available to detect early recurrence, so we hope to find a biological marker that could help identify those most at risk,” says Carole Fakhry, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

For the new study, Fakhry and her colleagues focused their attention on the antibodies, or immune system protein the body produces to fight HPV-related cancer proteins. One such antibody, called E6, is strongly linked to the diagnosis of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer.

Levels of the E6 antibody should fall when a patient is treated and cured of their cancer, Fakhry and her colleagues reasoned, so an increase in a patient’s E6 levels after treatment might indicate a higher risk of the cancer returning.

To find out, the researchers looked back at the health records and blood serum samples of 60 patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer and a median age of 56, mostly Caucasian men, who were treated at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Some 43 of the patients had samples taken before their treatment, 34 had samples taken up to six months after therapy, and 52 had samples taken six months or later after therapy. Among the 60 patients, Fakhry and colleagues identified six cases of recurring cancer within an average of 4.4 years of follow-up after treatment.

The scientists looked at a variety of HPV cancer cell antibodies in these patients and discovered that the average level of most of these antibodies was lower after treatment. Patients who had high levels of E6 antibody before their treatment were seven times more likely than those with lower levels to have their cancer return, they also found.

Fakhry says the study is a promising start toward finding a way to identify patients most at risk for a cancer recurrence through the use of a blood test, but much more data are needed to confirm E6’s usefulness as a biomarker. One of the best ways to proceed, she says, would be to conduct a study of the antibody on a large group of patients at the start of their treatment, drawing blood at a series of predetermined points during their therapy to examine E6 levels.

At the moment, these HPV antibodies are not measured routinely in patients, so it is difficult to estimate the costs and time needed to conduct such a “gold-standard” trial, she notes.

More research is also needed to know whether such tests would be useful in determining the path of a patient’s follow-up care, such as whether and how often a patient might need imaging or clinical exams to watch for a cancer’s possible return.

“Potentially, a low-risk patient may need less stringent surveillance while a high-risk patient may require more intense imaging,” Fakhry explains. “But this is far away from clinical practice, as we would really need to understand whether this hypothetical approach [with E6] would improve lead time to diagnosis of recurrence and survival outcomes.”


Other Johns Hopkins scientists who contributed to the research include Jesse Qualliotine, Zhe Zhang, Nishant Agrawal, Daria Gaykalova, Justin Bishop, Rathan M. Subramaniam, Wayne Koch, Christine Chung, David W. Eisele, Joseph Califano and Raphael P. Viscidi.

Funding for the study was provided by the Oral Cancer Foundation and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (P50DE019032-13).

*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

Expanded age indication cleared for Gardasil 9 in males

Author: Erin Bastick

FDA approved an expanded age indication for Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine, Recombinant (Gardasil 9, Merck) in males.

Seven HPV types in Gardasil 9 (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) cause approximately 90% to 95% of HPV-related anal cancers, 90% of cervical cancers, and 80% of high-grade cervical lesions worldwide.These 7 types also cause the majority of HPV-related vulvar and vaginal cancers. Gardasil 9 includes the greatest number of HPV (Human Papillomavirus) types of any available HPV vaccine.

Gardasil 9 was previously approved for use in girls and young women aged 9 to 26 years for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers caused by HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 22, 45, 52, and 58, and genital warts caused by HPV types 6 and 11. As for use in male patients, the vaccine was previously approved for use in boys aged 9 to 15 years for the prevention of anal cancer caused by HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, precancerous or dysplastic lesions caused by HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

With the newest approval, Gardasil 9 is now also indicated for use in males aged 16 to 26 years for the prevention of these diseases. According to the CDC, HPV vaccination rates are unacceptably low compared to rates for other adolescent vaccines, and vaccination coverage in males is especially low in males. The approval of the expanded age indication in male patients was based on results from a clinical trial program for Gardasil 9 that was designed to build upon the safety and efficacy established in clinical trials with Gardasil [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant].

“Any health plans that have not yet made a decision regarding coverage for Gardasil 9 for males 16-26 can do so now that that the vaccine is indicated in this population,” according to a company statement from Merck. “Most managed care plans have already made decisions to cover the cost of Gardasil 9, including for males 16 through 26 years of age, making the number of plans covering Gardasil 9 similar to the number covering the cost of Gardasil. The approval of Gardasil 9 for males 16 through 26 years of age is a milestone in the planned transition from Gardasil to Gardasil 9, as both products are now approved for the same populations.”

The most common adverse reactions associated with the use of Gardasil 9 in males aged 16 to 26 years included injection-site pain, swelling, and erythema. Not all vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers are caused by HPV; Gardasil 9 only protects against those cancers caused by HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58. Gardasil 9 is contraindicated in individuals with hypersensitivity, including severe allergic reactions to yeast, or after a previous dose of Gardasil 9 or Gardasil.

This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

December, 2015|Oral Cancer News|

Depressed Head and Neck Cancer Patients Have Lower Survival and Higher Recurrence Risk

Author: Kathy Boltz, PhD

Depression is a significant predictor of 5-year survival and recurrence in patients with head and neck cancer, according to a new study published in Pyschosomatic Medicine (doi: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000256). These findings represent one of the largest studies to report on the impact of depression on cancer survival.

Although depression can have obvious detrimental effects on a person’s quality of life, its impact on cancer patients is more apparent, explained lead author Eileen Shinn, PhD, assistant professor of Behavioral Science at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston. Increasing evidence shows modest associations between elevated symptoms of depression and greater risk for mortality among patients with lung, breast, ovarian, and kidney cancers.

The research team sought to clarify the influence of depression on survival, focusing their analysis on a single cancer type. By limiting the sample set and adjusting for factors known to affect outcome, such as age, tumor size, and previous chemotherapy, they were able to uncover a more profound impact of depression.

The researchers followed 130 patients at MD Anderson with newly diagnosed oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a type of cancer in which the tumor originates at the back of the throat and base of the tongue.

At the beginning of their radiation therapy, Patients completed a validated questionnaire at the beginning of their radiation therapy to identify symptoms of clinical depression. Researchers monitored the participants, all of whom completed treatment, until their last clinic visit or death, a median period of 5 years.

“The results of this study were quite intriguing, showing depression was a significant factor predicting survival at 5 years, even after controlling for commonly accepted prognostic factors,” said senior author Adam Garden, MD, professor, Radiation Oncology. Furthermore, depression was the only factor shown to have a significant impact on survival.

Patients who scored as depressed on the questionnaire were 3.5 times less likely to have survived to the 5-year interval compared with those who did not score as depressed. The degree of depression was also found to be significant, as every unit increase on this scale indicated a 10% higher risk for reduced survival.

The results were replicated with a different psychological health survey and were not influenced by how soon following diagnosis the depression assessment was done.

OSCC is diagnosed in 10 000 to 15 000 Americans each year. Major risk factors known to be associated with OSCC include smoking and tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Incidence of OSCC has doubled in the last 20 years due to increasing HPV infection rates, noted Shinn.

Neither alcohol nor tobacco use, also surveyed in this group, had a significant impact on survival. HPV infection status, when available, also did not appear correlated.

Despite a high cure rate, normally 60% to 80%, recurrence rate of disease is unusually high in these patients (approximately 30%). The researchers also investigated a potential link between depression and disease recurrence.

“When we controlled for all variables, depression was linked with a nearly 4 times higher risk of recurrence,” said Shinn. In addition, never smokers had a 73% lower chance of recurrence, compared with current smokers. Those were the only two factors associated with cancer recurrence.

This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

December, 2015|Oral Cancer News|

Poison’s Rikki Rockett Reveals He Is Battling Oral Cancer

Author: Chad Childers

Poison drummer Rikki Rockett revealed during an appearance on the Eddie Trunk Live radio show that he’s completed nine rounds of chemotherapy and seven weeks of radiation treatments after being diagnosed with oral cancer this past summer and that he’ll find out in February if the treatments were successful.

Rockett told Trunk (as transcribed by Blabbermouth), “[In] June, I kind of got sick. I had this horrible cold, sore-throat thing, and they were scoping me and they were doing biopsies, and nothing was coming up. And finally a doctor at USC did a biopsy and took a look and he said, ‘I believe you have oral cancer.’ And what it was is a tumor at the base of my tongue … This is very similar to Bruce Dickinson, very similar to Michael Douglas, similar to Tom Hamilton, as far as I know; I don’t know the details of his. And two adjacent lymph nodes that it kind of … Normally, it does spread to the lymph nodes; that’s typical. That’s how you find out you have it ninety percent of the time.”

According to the Rockett, his doctor told him that it was a very treatable cancer, but was “a son of a bitch to treat.” He was then told that he would either have to undergo radiation and chemotherapy at the same time or undergo surgery, but even if he chose the latter, he might still have to do radiation and chemotherapy.

Rockett revealed that it was tough, explaining, “I did thirty-five rounds of radiation; it was five days a week for seven weeks, and that kicks your dick into the dirt. But I went, ‘Okay, this is what I’m gonna do. I wanna beat it, so I’m just gonna go head first into this. I’m gonna set myself up where every single day, I do something positive for my health. I’m gonna work out one day, I’m gonna go to therapy one day.’”

He continued, “At the end of the day, it was really the worst thing that you can go through, for me. I’ve had a decent life, you know what I mean? I mean, we all go through our stuff. I’m not saying my life is a bed of roses, but I’m not a war veteran who got this too. I didn’t get my leg blown off and get cancer. Those guys are the guys that are really the heroes and paying for it. So for me, it was just a battle that I had to get through, and I got to the point where I couldn’t really talk. I had, I think, sixteen canker sores in my mouth at one time. And it’s, like, if you could take your throat and turn it inside out and sunburn it… I had to use this stuff called Magic Mouthwash just to drink the water. It hurt so bad, I couldn’t… And I’m still on a liquid diet.”

As for his decision to keep his cancer treatment quiet, the rocker revealed, “I wanted to see how I would do with [the treatment]. And I didn’t want people to maybe come down to USC and [take] spy photos, like TMZ guys or something like that. And I didn’t want anybody talking to my family about it or anything like that. It’s, like, you wanna forget about it when you can. So when I first start to talk about it, [I didn’t want it to be a situation where] I’d be at the mall, and I’m playing with my little girl or something, and somebody would go, like, ‘Hey, man, how’s the throat doing?’ It’s, like, ‘I just forgot about it for the last forty-five minutes and now you had to remind me.’ And everybody has a horror story. ‘Oh, you have cancer? My mom had cancer. She died from it.’ I don’t wanna hear anybody’s horror stories.”

Rockett revealed that all signs are that he’s responded well to the treatment and that he’s hoping to get good news when he goes for his PET scan in February. “I’m just gonna try to put that out of my mind for now and just continue to get better and feel better,” says Rockett. “There’s nothing that looks like it’s there anymore. They’ve gone down, they’ve looked at my throat… But it’s swelled up and it’s hard to tell, but it looks like it’s in remission.”

During the chat, Rockett revealed that his tongue cancer was caused by HPV, which is currently the number one cause of oral cancer.

While Poison were out of action during 2015, Rockett kept busy with the self-titled debut album from his band Devil City Angels.

This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

December, 2015|Oral Cancer News|

Forward Science and Oral Cancer Foundation partner in video to spread oral cancer awareness

Author: DentistryIQ Editors
Click here to view Carol Layer’s story, told by her daughter Rachel

In an effort to increase awareness about the importance of annual oral cancer screenings, Forward Science, the creators of OralID, and the Oral Cancer Foundation have partnered to share the story of a family’s loss after a protracted and difficult battle with oral cancer.

In a video narrated by the daughter of an oral cancer victim, the importance of regular/routine oral cancer screenings is stressed, and the daughter shares a first-hand view of why early detection is critical.

To view the touching story of Carol Layer’s fight with oral cancer, told by her extraordinary daughter, Rachel, visit

“Until there is a cure, the best solution is early discovery. Early detection can not only save people’s lives, but preserve the quality of life.” Rachel continues to compete in marathons and relay races in her mother’s memory, wearing “Carol’s Fight” on her shirt in every race. She emphasizes the importance of sharing her mom’s story with the world, with the hope of preventing future stories like her own.

She said, “I certainly learned a lot about life and death and what it meant to be resilient through her, and I hope my mom’s story carries forward to people.”

At 44 years old, Carol Layer had no traditional risk factors (alcohol or tobacco use) and was not a patient who was in the high-risk category for oral cancer. Carol found a lesion on the side of her tongue and decided to have it examined by her dentist. After numerous referrals, and even a negative biopsy, Carol’s worst fear became a reality: she was diagnosed with Stage IV oral cancer. She fought oral cancer for 9 long years before sadly losing her battle in 2011. Carol is survived by her husband and two children. Oral cancer kills one American ever hour, and it continues to affect patients who may not have traditional risk factors. The key to lowering the number of fatalities due to this vicious disease is the discovery of lesions or suspicious tissues before they progress into cancer.

With the oral cancer screening devices available today, such as the OralID, many times clinicians may now have a way to discover abnormalities before they are visible with the naked eye.

Forward Science is a privately held medical device company based in Houston, Texas. With the launch of OralID and CytID, Forward Science provides dental offices with a complete oral health protocol, entitled F.A.C.T. (Fluorescence Assessment and Cytology Test). For more information, go to or call (855) 696-7254.

The Oral Cancer Foundation, founded by oral cancer survivor Brian R. Hill, is an IRS registered non-profit 501(c)(3) public service charity that provides information, patient support, sponsorship of research, and advocacy related to oral cancer. The Oral Cancer Foundation maintains the web site:

This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

Patient Support in Oral Cancer: From Sydney to New York to London, survivors and patients interact through an important portal to get through difficult times

Author: Press Release

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif., Sept. 28, 2015 — The word “cancer” will incite fear in anyone. When that word comes at the end of a sentence that began with your name, the impact can be life changing. “I had a great job, a beautiful house and a happy family life,” recalls oral cancer survivor and Oral Cancer Foundation (OCF) Director of Patient Support Services, Christine Brader. “All that changed once I got sick.” Those affected by oral cancer, like Christine, are saddled not only with the physical challenges of treating and surviving the disease, but they must also live with the emotional uncertainty and anxiety that accompanies a diagnosis. OCF’s Patient Support Forum ( was created specifically to provide patients with the information, guidance, and support they need to face a cancer diagnosis. Now in its 15th year, it has helped tens of thousands navigate a difficult path.

It was nearly 16 years ago that oral cancer survivor and OCF founder Brian Hill began his search for answers. “When I was first diagnosed,” Hill recalls, “I was scrambling for the right information. Once inside the treatment world I was faced with decisions about which treatment path was right for me, uncertainties of what would lay ahead, the arrival of complications unexpected, pain, and ultimately a sense of the loss of control and a resulting fear.” While hospital support groups and some online chat rooms existed at the time, they fell short of providing the insights, guidance and accessibility necessary to have real benefit to a newly diagnosed cancer patient undergoing treatment. “My problems were complex and changing daily. Every day it seemed that something new was occurring that complicated matters, and I needed to talk with someone who could help me digest everything from the new medical terminology, to dealing with side effects of what I was undergoing.” It was through building relationships with other survivors and exchanging stories and information that Hill was able regain hope and envision life after cancer.

In 2001, seeing a need for patients to connect with one another, Hill worked to develop an interactive online forum where patients and survivors could share their knowledge and tell their stories. Christine Brader joined the forum after her first oral cancer diagnosis in 2007. “When I was diagnosed I didn’t know which way to turn, and by finding others who had gone through it, I gained significant peace of mind,” she recalls. “After my third cancer recurrence, I lost 65 pounds, was hospitalized twice for dehydration and malnutrition and was ready to quit. The doctors don’t always prepare patients for the realities of the difficult treatments.” It was the advice from other survivors, words of encouragement and support from the OCF forum community that convinced Christine to continue her treatments and gave her hope. “There’s a whole world of people who have gotten through it and survived, they are living in a world after cancer and are thriving” she says. “Given the extensive disfiguring surgeries, and compromises that I would be forced to live with, I was uncertain if there was even a place for me in the world after fighting to survive. Single, unable to work in my previous vocation, I could not wrap my mind around how I would fit back into a world where everything from esthetics, to the ability to speak clearly carry so much weight. But through this online vehicle, I built friendships, and through one person in particular I was repeatedly told that there can be a rich vibrant life after this terrible cancer, which can leave its visible damage even after survival, no matter how different I was after it all. The transition was not easy, but they were right. Life after my battle is rich in relationships, and meaningful work.” Now, as the patient support administrator for OCF, Christine offers her experience-based insights and emotional support to others just beginning their own battles.

Unlike public chat rooms and social media based groups, OCF’s Patient Support Forum was designed with the users’ privacy and safety in mind. OCF’s forum users’ personal information will never be marketed to by outside companies, and they will never be exposed to advertising; both considerations associated with social media platforms. Anonymous screen names protect privacy and facilitate an open dialogue for difficult topics such as intimacy and depression. “It was important to develop rules to ensure that the information on the forum is reputable, and accurate. Misinformation can facilitate poor decision making, and harm people,” says Hill. To that end, the forum is heavily monitored by volunteer staff with diverse medical backgrounds including dentistry, oncology, research, and nursing and of course long term survivors themselves. Both Hill and Brader agree that the survivors are often the most adept at answering questions correctly and sensitively. “Survivors direct experience many times trumps clinical experience of professionals, though we would never suggest that they have the same level of knowledge. But living on the receiving end of the treatment process definitely provides you with a much different perspective. We don’t let inaccurate information live on our boards,” says Hill, “and we will correct or eliminate the information/comments that are incorrect or scientifically unsupported.”

It is this kind of monitoring and oversight that earned OCF’s websites, and, Health on the Net’s HONcode certification. The HONcode is a designation reserved for online publishers of trustworthy and reliable medical and health information who have volunteered to adhere to hundreds of strict guidelines and Health on the Net’s code of ethics. This certification is an oversight process that is ongoing, to ensure the consumer that information presented is trustworthy and scientifically accurate; and that protocols for proper informed interaction are in place. With the understanding that poor information can lead to poor choices, OCF has gone to great lengths to protect its members from misleading information.

Today, the Oral Cancer Foundation is working hard to make patients and their families aware that support and answers are available online, for free, 24 hours a day by visiting the web based forum. In keeping with OCF’s missions to reduce suffering and save lives through prevention, education, research, advocacy, and patient support, the forum has been designed to fulfill the need for reliable medical information and emotional support. With over 10,000 active members, thousands more who visit the site, read the threads of discussion without becoming members or posting themselves, and over a quarter million archived threads of information, the forum has grown into the largest and most well curated databases of oral cancer information and emotional support on the internet. Members now span across the globe and dozens of countries. Even oncology researchers have looked to this online community to develop answers and insights into understanding the patient experience, and improving the ways in which they interact with patients, and anticipate their needs both physical and emotional.

When discussing the relationships he’s made on the forum, Ed Brown, now a 12-year oral cancer survivor says, “Finding each other is the greatest thing that has ever happened to us. When you feel like you’re some kind of freak and struggling alone with your issues, it’s the best feeling to find out there is someone else out there who has dealt with the same thing, someone who knows what it’s like, someone who understands the “work-arounds” for some of the complications of treatments that we all deal with. Thanks to the forum I now know 10,000 survivors who because of our shared experiences are a resource I can turn to.”  Few people can comprehend the pain and hardship of undergoing treatment for a life threatening illness, fewer are aware of the emotional isolation and lonesomeness that accompanies the disease. Only survivors, other patients, and their caregivers live the intimate struggles and battles of will that take place when fighting for your life.

“The support forum became a second family really, not just a bunch of patients or survivors, but a community that I was a part of. We’ve all shared a common experience, endured treatment, survival, complications, and funerals. The camaraderie in the community is the heart and soul of what OCF really is – a group of people helping other people,” says Hill. The individuals who use the support forum have made lifelong friendships and passed along their experiences and knowledge to others.  Brown says, “For every success I’ve had on this journey, likely a thousand people will have known about it.” Sharing in the successes of others and giving back to a community that has embraced you during your difficult times are important reasons why many of the thousands of forum users continue to use the site after they’ve been declared “disease free.”

Hill has called the patient support forum the “heart and soul” of the foundation. Given the foundations many diverse activities; from sponsoring research to advocacy, those that populate the OCF forum, who choose to spend part of their new lives in service to those behind them on the path, he feels they are the palpable core of what OCF is. Few face-to-face support groups can deal with the daily needs of patient ups and downs, as they most often meet once a month, and have less depth of experience to draw from as there are fewer individuals to share their experiences, and fewer survivors attending as they move on from their cancer experience. The OCF forum idea, created well before Google was the major search engine we know today, and before any social media companies like Facebook even existed, has a decade and a half of experience as an Internet based platform to help others… as often as they find a need for it.

Oral cancer is not fought with treatment staff and medicine alone, but in conjunction with reliable medical information to facilitate good decision making, and emotional support and guidance when the questions and weight of the experience seem overwhelming. OCF’s Patient Support Forum is a resource rich with answers, accessible anytime, from nearly anywhere, anonymous, monitored and safe, and free to anyone in need.

For more information about the Oral Cancer Foundation and the Patient Support Forum, please visit and

About the Oral Cancer Foundation:
The Oral Cancer Foundation, founded by oral cancer survivor Brian R. Hill, is an IRS registered non-profit 501(c)(3) public service charity that provides information, patient support, sponsorship of research, and advocacy related to oral cancer. Oral cancer is the largest group of those cancers that fall into the head and neck cancer category. Common names for it include such things as mouth cancer, tongue cancer, head and neck cancer, and throat cancer. The Oral Cancer Foundation maintains the web sites:,,, and, which receive millions of hits per month. Supporting the foundation’s goals is a scientific advisory board composed of leading cancer authorities from varied medical and dental specialties, and from prominent educational, treatment, and research institutions in the United States. The foundation also manages the Bruce Paltrow Oral Cancer Fund, a collaboration between the Paltrow family represented by Ms. Blythe Danner (Paltrow), Gwyneth Paltrow, Jake Paltrow and the Oral Cancer Foundation.

Band Announces Iron Maiden Singer is Battling Tongue Cancer

Author: Maria Puente


Iron Maiden singer Bruce Dickinson is being treated for cancer of the tongue, the heavy metal band announced on its website Thursday. But it was caught early, seven weeks of chemotherapy and radiation have just been completed, and a full recovery is expected, the announcement said. “Bruce is doing very well considering the circumstances and the whole team are very positive,” it concluded.

The announcement said that before Christmas, Dickinson visited his doctor for a routine check-up. This led to tests and biopsies, which revealed a small cancerous tumor at the back of his tongue.

“As the tumor was caught in the early stages, the prognosis thankfully is extremely good,” the announcement said. “Bruce’s medical team fully expect him to make a complete recovery with the all-clear envisaged by late May.

“It will then take a further few months for Bruce to get back to full fitness. In the meantime we would ask for your patience, understanding and respect for Bruce and his family’s privacy until we update everyone by the end of May.”

Dickinson, 56, joined the British megastar band in the early 1980s, and is also a commercial airline pilot. Iron Maiden’s hits include Run to the Hills and The Number of the Beast.

Last year, the band announced that Clive Burr, former drummer with Iron Maiden, had died in his London home in March. He was 56 and had multiple sclerosis.


*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.
February, 2015|Oral Cancer News|

The Cancer Cure Parents Aren’t Using

Author: Meredith Wadman


Not so long ago, when my sons still had smooth cheeks and children’s voices, I had them vaccinated against human papillomavirus, the most common sexually transmitted disease. It was late 2011, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had just recommended that boys join girls in being vaccinated at age 11 or 12. I was certainly receptive: HPV, as it’s commonly called, causes cervical cancer, cancer of the tonsils, cancer of the back of the tongue and, less often, cancers of the vulva, vagina, anus and penis. It seemed important to ensure that my kids were protected.

Yet numbers released last month by the CDC show that my sons, now 14 and 15, are among a small minority of adolescent males who have been vaccinated. In 2013, just 14 percent of American boys ages 13 to 17 had received all three recommended doses of the HPV vaccine. (The CDC also recommends “catch-up” vaccination for males up to age 21.)

Not that parents are rushing to have their girls vaccinated either, even though the CDC first recommended the vaccine for prepubescent girls in 2007 and virtually all insurers pay for it. In 2013, fewer than 38 percent of American girls between 13 and 17 had received the full three-dose course.

It is heartbreaking to watch a safe, effective vaccine go unused. Consider this: The CDC estimates that increasing the vaccination rate of American girls to 80 percent would prevent 53,000 cervical cancers during the lifetimes of girls who are now 12 and younger.

When I had my sons vaccinated, it was partly with girls in mind. After all, if fewer young men are infected, fewer young women will be exposed to the virus that causes cervical cancer — currently the most common cancer prevented by the vaccine. But now I am realizing that HPV poses a growing risk to boys.

A new breed of cancer of the back of the tongue and tonsils, caused by HPV, is rising in incidence — likely caused, researchers suspect, by increases in premarital sex and oral sex over the past several decades. These cancers afflict men far more often than women, and at relatively younger ages than do other head and neck cancers, which typically appear in men older than 60. Middle-aged men who don’t die from their HPV-linked cancer often must live for years with the side effects of intensive chemotherapy and radiation delivered to the back of the throat. These can include the permanent inability to swallow and the appearance later ofnew, aggressive, radiation-induced cancers.

If this trend continues, we are going to see more cancer of the back of the tongue and the tonsils caused by HPV. One recent analysis of 30 studies, conducted by University of Wisconsin researchers, found that the proportion of such cancers caused by HPV rose from 21 percent before 1990 to 65 percent after 2000. Anil Chaturvedi of the National Cancer Institute and his colleagues have estimated, based on recent trends, that by 2020 there will be more new cases of these HPV-induced throat cancers in the United States each year than new cervical cancer cases.

So the actor Michael Douglas did us all a service when he was so frank with Britain’s Guardian newspaper last year. When asked if his throat cancer had been caused by heavy drinking and smoking, which are also risk factors for the disease, the actor replied: “No. I mean, without getting too specific, this particular cancer in tests is caused by something called HPV, which actually comes about from cunnilingus.”

Many parents don’t like to think of their 11- and 12-year-olds as sexual creatures. Ironically, the CDC recommendation assumes not that kids are sexually active at this tender age but rather that they are not: The point of vaccination is to close the door before the horse is out of the barn.

It’s no use telling yourself that your child isn’t “that kind” of kid. The fact is, HPV is so common that almost all sexually active adults are infected at some point. Last year, the CDC estimated that about 79 million Americans were infected, most of them in their late teens and early 20s.

Most people who get HPV have a transient infection that their immune system clears with no lasting damage. But in some people, the virus takes up residence and goes on to cause cancer. I am grateful that, thanks to the HPV vaccine, I will never have to find out if my sons fell into that second, unlucky group.

 *This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.
August, 2014|Oral Cancer News|

Former LA Laker Michael Cooper diagnosed with tongue cancer

Author: Mark Medina

Former Laker Michael Cooper will take a leave of absence as the head coach of the WNBA’s Atlanta Dream because of early stage tongue cancer. Cooper plans to have a surgical procedure this week at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University in Atlanta and is expected to recover in two weeks. Assistant coach Karleen Thompson will assume head coaching duties during Cooper’s absence.

“The doctors and staff at Emory have been tremendous, and I know I’m in good hands,” Cooper said in a statement. “I’m fortunate that my condition was diagnosed early, and this episode illustrates the importance of screening and early detection. I know the team will be in good hands with Coach Thompson at the helm during my absence, and I look forward to returning to the court soon.”

Cooper has guided Atlanta to an Eastern Conference best 15-6 record in his first season. He also coached the East to a 125-124 overtime win at the WNBA All-Star game on Saturday.

Cooper is best known as a defensive specialist with the Showtime Lakers (1978-90) where he won five NBA championships. He also coached the Los Angeles Sparks to two WNBA championships (2001, 2002). Cooper left his second stint with the Sparks to coach the USC’s women’s basketball team. But he resigned in March after finishing 11-20, his first losing record in four seasons.

*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.


July, 2014|Oral Cancer News|

Aerosmith’s Tom Hamilton begins to put post-cancer struggle behind him

Author: Staff

Aerosmith’s Tom Hamilton admits the after effects of cancer treatment came back to ”bite” him.

The bass player, who was told his throat and tongue cancer had returned in 2011, had a difficult year last year after he pulled out of the band’s tour of Australia and was replaced by David Hull due to health issues.

He told ”I had a couple of situations last year that I’m past. Sometimes the after effects of cancer treatment sort of come back to bite you later on down the road. That happened last year, but I’m feeling great now … having an awesome time out here.”

The 62-year-old musician is now looking forward to touring the US with his Aerosmith band mates – Steven Tyler, Joe Perry, Brad Whitford and Joey Kramer – and he realises there might not be many more opportunities to play live which is why the band put their differences aside.

He said: ”I think we all know that we’re nearer the end than the beginning of this whole thing and nobody wants to miss anything – I certainly don’t.

”I don’t want to miss all the amazing stuff there is out in the world for us right now just because of an argument or because somebody is too burned out and they lash out or something. Everything is forgivable when you consider what’s out there for us if we can keep it together…”

Asked if he had considered retiring from the group, he replied: ”Yeah, we have periods when we’re off the road for a few months at a time. But I start to realise that I’m so used to being out on the road that sometimes being at home I feel like I don’t do it right!

”I like having nice long breaks in between tours, but I do get itchy to get back out here, especially knowing that there’s a lot of people that want us. They’re waiting for us to come back. That’s something that’s a joy for us.”

*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.
June, 2014|Oral Cancer News|