photoshop price list buy pdf converter buy microsoft money 2007 business cheap rosetta stone cheap parallels for mac buy win xp pro cd autodesk 3ds max student discount buy nero 7 buy dragon naturally speaking 10 essentials buy microsoft windows 7 oem best price office 2007 small business upgrade buy adobe lightroom student buy 2003 server software buy adobe indesign cs4 for mac windows 2008 enterprise buy best buy after effects buy reason 4.0 1 best price camtasia 6 buy quicken deluxe 2008 buy adobe photoshop elements 7 mac buy microsoft office 2003 cheap buy reason 5 buy fireworks cs6 best price microsoft project 2007 buy adobe acrobat student cheapest adobe dreamweaver cs3 buy 2010 ms access microsoft access 2003 price buy nero 8 ultra buy microsoft money plus home & business 2008

US cancer survivors grows to nearly 12 million

Thu, Mar 17, 2011

Oral Cancer News

Source: www.cancer.gov
Author: staff

The number of cancer survivors in the United States increased to 11.7 million in 2007, according to a report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. There were 3 million cancer survivors in 1971 and 9.8 million in 2001. The study, “Cancer Survivors in the United States, 2007,” is published today in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

A cancer survivor is defined as anyone who has been diagnosed with cancer, from the time of diagnosis through the balance of his or her life.

“It’s good news that so many are surviving cancer and leading long, productive, and healthy lives,” said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Preventing cancer and detecting it early remain critically important as some cancers can be prevented or detected early enough to be effectively treated. Not smoking, getting regular physical activity, eating healthy foods, and limiting alcohol use can reduce the risk of many cancers.”

To determine the number of survivors, the authors analyzed the number of new cases and follow-up data from NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program between 1971 and 2007. Population data from the 2006 and 2007 United States Census were also included. The researchers estimated the number of persons ever diagnosed with cancer who were alive on Jan. 1, 2007 (except non-melanoma skin cancers, which are fairly common and rarely fatal).

Study findings indicate:

  • Of the 11.7 million people living with cancer in 2007, 7 million were ages 65 years or older.
  • Women make up a large proportion of cancer survivors (54 percent).
  • Breast cancer survivors are the largest group of cancer survivors (22 percent), followed by prostate cancer survivors (19 percent) and colorectal cancer survivors (10 percent).
  • Among all survivors, 4.7 million received their diagnosis 10 or more years earlier.

“As the number of cancer survivors continues to increase, it is important for medical and public health professionals to be knowledgeable of issues survivors may face, especially the long-term effects of treatment on their physical and psychosocial well-being,” said Arica White, Ph.D., M.P.H., an epidemic intelligence service officer in CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. “This understanding is critical in promoting good health and coordinating comprehensive care for cancer survivors.”

The authors note that the increase in number of cancer survivors is due to many factors, including a growing aging population, early detection, improved diagnostic methods, more effective treatment, and improved clinical follow-up after treatment.

“There is now a growing number of people who have faced a cancer diagnosis and what that means for them and their loved ones – from the time of diagnosis through the rest of their lives,” said Julia H. Rowland, Ph.D., director of NCI’s Office of Cancer Survivorship. “Unfortunately for many cancer survivors and those around them, the effect of cancer does not end with the last treatment. Research has allowed us to scratch the surface of understanding the unique risks, issues, and concerns of this population. This report underscores the need for continued research, as well as for the development and implementation of best practices to provide optimal care and support for all cancer survivors.”

For the full report, visit http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/.

Print Friendly
Be Sociable, Share!
, , , , ,

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.