tobacco

FDA to review application to modify health warning on Altria subsidiary’s smokeless tobacco product

Source: www.richmond.com
Author: staff

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will review a request from an Altria Group Inc. subsidiary that wants to make the claim that a smokeless tobacco product is less dangerous than cigarettes. U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Co. said Friday that the FDA has agreed to do a substantive review of its “modified risk” application for Copenhagen Snuff Fine Cut. The company submitted the request for review earlier this year.

The snuff company wants to be able to use the claim “If you smoke consider this: Switching completely to this product from cigarettes reduces risk of lung cancer.”

The FDA requires smokeless tobacco products to carry statements that warn about the risk of mouth cancer, gum disease, tooth loss and addiction and that the product is not a safe alternative to cigarettes. The warnings are to be randomly rotated on packaging.

“We filed this application because we think adult smokers looking for potential reduced risk alternatives to cigarettes should have accurate information about the relative risks of Copenhagen Snuff,” Joe Murillo, Altria Client Services senior vice president for regulatory affairs, said in a statement.

The FDA defines modified risk tobacco products as tobacco products that are sold or distributed for use to reduce harm or the risk of tobacco-related disease associated with commercially marketed tobacco products.
In the review process, the FDA’s Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee vets the scientific claims and makes a recommendation.

The FDA has reviewed more than 30 modified risk applications from tobacco companies since 2011, but none has been approved. Some remain under review, while others were denied by the agency or withdrawn by the companies that submitted them.

September, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Scientists map interactions between head and neck cancer and HPV virus

Source: medicalxpress.com
Author: staff, Gladstone Institutes

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely known to cause nearly all cases of cervical cancer. However, you might not know that HPV also causes 70 percent of oropharyngeal cancer, a subset of head and neck cancers that affect the mouth, tongue, and tonsils. Although vaccines that protect against HPV infection are now available, they are not yet widespread, especially in men, nor do they address the large number of currently infected cancer patients.

Patients with head and neck cancer caused by HPV respond very differently to treatments than those whose cancer is associated with the consumption of tobacco products. The first group generally has better outcomes, with almost 80 percent of patients surviving longer than 5 years after diagnosis, compared to only 45-50 percent for patients with tobacco-related cancers.

To better understand what might cause these differences, a team of scientists led by Nevan J. Krogan, Ph.D., senior investigator at the Gladstone Institutes, is taking a unique approach by focusing on the cancer-causing virus. They recently mapped the interactions between all HPV proteins and human proteins for the first time. Their findings are published today in the journal Cancer Discovery.

“With our study, we identified several new protein interactions that were previously not known to cause cancer, expanding our knowledge of the oncogenic roles of the HPV virus” said Krogan, who is also a professor of cellular and molecular pharmacology at UC San Francisco (UCSF) and the director of the Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI) at UCSF. “The human proteins we found interacting with HPV are involved in both virus- and tobacco-related cancers, which means they could be potential targets for the development of new drugs or therapies.”

A Complete Picture of Virus-Cancer Connections
Krogan and Manon Eckhardt, Ph.D., a postdoctoral scholar in his laboratory at Gladstone, developed an integrated strategy to identify all the interactions between HPV proteins and human proteins. First, using a method called mass spectrometry, they discovered a total of 137 interactions between HPV and human proteins.

Then, in collaboration with computational biologist Wei Zhang, Ph.D., in the laboratory of Trey Ideker, Ph.D., at UC San Diego School of Medicine, they looked at entire networks of each protein—rather than only individual proteins—to detect the most important players. They also compared their list of proteins with data from HPV-associated cancer samples published by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. This large consortium catalogued genetic mutations in tumors of various cancers.

“We integrated together these two sets of data to get a comprehensive look at potential cancer-causing interactions between HPV and head and neck cancers,” said Krogan, who is co-director of the Cancer Cell Map Initiative. “This combined proteomic and genetic approach provided us with a systematic way to study the cellular mechanisms hijacked by virally induced cancers.”

Common Pathways in HPV-Induced and Smoking-Related Cancers
By overlaying the protein interaction and genomics data, the scientists discovered that the HPV virus targets the same human proteins that are frequently mutated in smoking-related cancers. Interestingly, those proteins are not mutated in HPV-positive cancers.

For example, their findings reconfirmed a well-established interaction between the human protein p53 and an HPV protein called E6. In HPV-negative cancers (those related to smoking), p53 is mutated in nearly all cases. However, the same protein is rarely ever mutated in HPV-positive cancer patients.

“In both cases, when p53 is inactivated, it leads to cancer,” explained Eckhardt, one of the first authors of the paper. “The difference is that the HPV virus finds a different way of attacking the same protein.”

In smoking-related cancers, p53 is mutated, which causes the cancer. Instead, in HPV-positive cancers, the viral protein E6 interacts with p53 and inactivates it, resulting in the same cancer, but without the mutation. This suggests the establishment of the viral infection and the development of tumors share common pathways.

“We thought there must be more proteins that can cause cancer either by being mutated or hijacked by HPV, so we developed a new method to detect them,” added Eckhardt. “Our study highlighted two interesting instances where the interaction of HPV and human proteins play a role in the development or invasiveness of the cancer.”

Eckhardt showed that the HPV protein E1 interacts with the human protein KEAP1, which is often mutated in smoking-related cancers. In HPV-positive cancers, KEAP1 is not mutated. But, through its interaction with the protein E1, KEAP1 is inactivated, which helps cancer cells survive.

The researchers also found that the HPV protein L2, which is part of the virus’s packaging, interacts with two human proteins called RNF20 and RNF40. They demonstrated that in HPV-positive cancers, this protein interaction increases the tumor’s ability to spread and invade new parts of the body.

These results confirm that the HPV virus causes head and neck cancer by targeting the same proteins that go awry in response to smoking-induced mutations.

Connecting Cancer and Infectious Diseases
Krogan and his collaborators have shown that integrating HPV-human interaction with tumor genome data, and focusing on genes that are mutated in HPV-negative but not HPV-positive tumors, constitutes a powerful approach to identify proteins that serve as both viral targets and genetic drivers of cancer.

The scientists’ work should lay the groundwork to find better therapeutic options for both HPV-negative and HPV-positive head and neck cancers. In addition, Krogan’s long-term goal is to define a pipeline that will enable the study of many other virally induced cancers, including those linked to Hepatitis B and C, Epstein-Barr virus, and adenoviruses.

“Science can be siloed, and through these unbiased, holistic approaches we can start to find common pathways between different systems,” said Krogan, who also leads the Host Pathogen Map Initiative, which aims to compare protein and genetic interactions across many pathogens and identify similarities. “Our work is helping connect the dots between cancer and infectious diseases in ways that have never been considered.”

September, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

E-cigarettes ‘could give you mouth cancer by damaging your DNA’

Source: metro.co.uk
Author: Zoe Drewett

Researchers say vaping could lead to an increased risk of developing mouth cancer. A study carried out by the American Chemical Society found evidence to suggest using e-cigarettes raises the level of DNA-damaging compounds in the mouth. If cells in the body are unable to repair the DNA damage after vaping, the risk of cancer can increase, the study claims.

The long-term effects of e-cigarettes are not yet known but researchers say they should be investigated further (Picture: PA)

The researchers admit the long-term health effects of using electronic cigarettes are still unknown. Researcher Dr Romel Dator said: ‘We want to characterize the chemicals that vapers are exposed to, as well as any DNA damage they may cause.’

Since they were introduced in 2004, e-cigarettes have been marketed as a safer alternative to smoking. But the team carrying out the study claim genetic material in the oral cells of people who vape could be altered by toxic chemicals. E-cigarettes work by heating a liquid – which usually contains nicotine – into an aerosol that the user inhales. It is often flavoured to taste like fruit, chocolate or bubblegum.

‘It’s clear that more carcinogens arise from the combustion of tobacco in regular cigarettes than from the vapor of e-cigarettes,’ Silvia Balbo, the project’s lead investigator said. ‘However, we don’t really know the impact of inhaling the combination of compounds produced by this device. ‘Just because the threats are different doesn’t mean that e-cigarettes are completely safe.’ The latest study, due to be presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society this week, analysed the saliva and mouth cells of five e-cigarette users before and after a 15-minute vaping session.

Researchers found levels of the toxic chemicals formaldehyde, acrolein and methylglyoxal had increased after vaping. Now they plan to follow up on the preliminary study with a larger one involving more e-cigarette users. They also want to see how the level of toxic chemicals differs between e-cigarette users and regular cigarette smokers.

According to a 2016 report by the US Surgeon General, 13.5% of middle school students, 37.7% of high school students and 35.8% of 18 to 24-year-olds have used e-cigarettes, compared with 16.4% of adults aged 25 and over. Ms Balbo, a professor at the Masonic Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota, said:

‘Comparing e-cigarettes and tobacco cigarettes is really like comparing apples and oranges.  The exposures are completely different. ‘We still don’t know exactly what these e-cigarette devices are doing and what kinds of effects they may have on health, but our findings suggest that a closer look is warranted.’

 

August, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

E-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco can put you at a greater risk of oral cancer, says study

Source: www.thehealthsite.com
Author: Sreemoyee Chatterjee

Not just cigarette smokers, those smoking e-cigarettes as well as consuming smokeless tobacco like chewing tobacco and more are at greater risk of developing oral cancer, shows a recent study conducted by University of California.

In case you think only cigarette smokers are at a higher risk of getting oral cancer, you are widely mistaken. A recent study has found that a wide majority of non-cigarette tobacco users as well those using electronic cigarettes are exposed to considerable level of carcinogen, as much as a cigarette user is exposed to. Not just that, shockingly smokeless tobacco users were found at a greater exposure to tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA). The study has been conducted by the scholars from University of California, San Francisco.

Starting from cigarettes to cigar, waterpipes, pipes, marijuana containing cigar to smokeless products like moist snuff, chewing tobacco, e-cigarettes, snus and other nicotine replacement products can increase your chance of getting oral cancer, revealed the study.

What is Oral cancer?
Belonging to the head and neck cancer group, oral cancer is a type of cancer that grows in mouth or throat tissues and mostly hit the squamous cells of your mouth, tongue and lips. Oral cancer can of several types – lip cancer, tongue cancer, cancer in the inner lining of your cheek, gums, floor of the mouth and hard and soft palate. It is important to go to a dentist for a biannual check-up for early detection of oral cancer, experts say. Due to lack of awareness and adequate check-ups, oral cancer gets detected only after they spread to the lymph nodes of the neck.

The other risk factors
Apart from tobacco consumption, both smoke and smokeless and excessive alcohol consumption, there are several other risk factors that can put you to greater risk of developing oral cancer. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, chronic facial exposure to sun, a former diagnosis of oral cancer, a family history of oral or any other types of cancer, a depleted body immune system, inadequate nutrition, genetic syndromes are other risk factors for oral cancer. Shockingly, being male is another potent risk factor as studies have found males to be at a higher risk of developing oral cancer, twice as likely compared to women.

Smoking warning labels could need a refresh to inform public of new health risk discoveries

Source: www.abc.net.au
Author: Tegan Taylor

When it comes to the health risks associated with smoking, most people know about lung cancer and heart disease. But less than a third of Australians realise it can also cause conditions such as acute leukaemia and rheumatoid arthritis, according to a new study, raising the question around whether current graphic cigarette warning labels need to be refreshed.

The study, published in the Medical Journal of Australia, asked 1,800 Australians about whether they thought smoking increased the risk of 23 conditions shown to be associated with tobacco use, such as lung cancer, stroke and diabetes.

While more than eight in 10 participants knew lung, throat and mouth cancers, heart disease and emphysema were linked to smoking, much fewer were aware it was associated with erectile dysfunction, female infertility, diabetes and liver cancer.

The results showed the current warning labels were doing their job, and that it might be time to expand them, said Michelle Scollo from Cancer Council Victoria, which ran the study.

“It was predictable and pleasing that smokers knew about the health effects that have been highlighted in the current sets of warnings and media campaigns,” Dr Scollo said.

“[But] fewer than half realised it could reduce your fertility, and that could have a really major impact on the course of people’s lives … There’s a lot that people need to appreciate.

Part of the reason the link between smoking and some of the conditions surveyed aren’t well known is because research into the health effects of tobacco use has advanced since the time the current warnings were developed, Dr Scollo said.

The current set of graphic warning labels have been in place since 2012.

“In 2014, the US Surgeon-General released a 50-year report — they released a whole updated statement of the diseases caused by smoking. Many more conditions were added to the list in 2014,” she said.

“These health warnings came into effect in 2011-12 and a lot more things have been established. Liver cancer, colon cancer … diabetes, erectile dysfunction.”

Dr Scollo hoped the research would lead to an expanded campaign including new graphic warning labels, showing more of smoking’s health risks.

“People need continuous reminders of these sort of things if they’re going to remember them but I don’t see why we need to be limited to just 14 warnings,” she said.

“I think we need as many warnings as we need to adequately warn people about the risks they face.”

Anti-smoking messaging doesn’t always resonate with people from marginalised groups. (AAP: Dave Hunt, file photo)

There is value in looking at people’s awareness of smoking’s risks, according to Australian National University anthropologist Simone Dennis, who researched the effects of the original graphic warning label campaign.

But she cautioned against automatically reaching for more graphic warning labels as the solution.

Health warnings about smoking were usually framed around a “particular middle-class version of health” and the assumption that more knowledge will change people’s behaviour, said Professor Dennis, who was not involved in the most recent study.

She said the original graphic warnings were effective in reducing smoking, especially among white, middle-class people, but doubted refreshing the campaign would see a similar reduction.

“I don’t know that the constant articulation of danger is doing anything for the people who are smoking,” she said.

The danger, Professor Dennis said, was that people whose behaviour wasn’t changed by the warning labels tended to be from marginalised groups, and pushing the same line risked marginalising them further.

“If you’re marginalised already, that’s a really heavy burden to bear because you’ve done something that’s perceived to be extraordinarily dangerous,” she said.

“[The campaign] missed them last time, they kept smoking, it’s probably going to miss them again. And that’s consequential because those are the people who are going to die.”

Be your own advocate

Source: www.wvnews.com
Author: Mary McKinley

The importance of dental care goes beyond cavities — it’s also about preventing cancer. The week of April 8 is National Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week, and your dentist or dental hygienist may be your first line of defense against oral cancer.

More than 50,000 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with oral or oropharyngeal cancer (cancer of the back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils) in 2018, and 350 will be diagnosed in West Virginia alone.

Routine dental exams can detect cancer or pre-cancers during the early stages. If you notice a persistent sore or pain, swelling or changes in your mouth, or red or white patches on the gums, tongue, tonsils or lining of the mouth, visit a doctor or dentist so they can examine your mouth more closely.

Some people diagnosed with oral cancer have no risk factors, so it’s important for everyone to keep those dental appointments.

If you use tobacco, drink alcohol in excess, or have the human papillomavirus (HPV), you have an increased risk for oral cancer. Oral cancer is more common in older adults, particularly men, but oropharyngeal cancer is on the rise in middle-aged, nonsmoking white men between the ages of 35 and 55. The majority of these types of cancer cases are caused by HPV.

Take charge of your health and reduce your risk of oral cancer. If you smoke or chew tobacco, quit now (it’s never too late). Moderate your alcohol consumption to no more than one drink a day for women or two for men.

If you have children, make sure they receive the HPV vaccine, which is recommended for all girls and boys ages 11 and 12; a “catch-up” vaccine is also available for young women up to age 26 and most young men up to age 21.

You can be your own best advocate. Check the inside of your mouth in the mirror each month, and speak up to your dentist or dental hygienist if you notice any changes that concern you.

Ask about cancer screenings when making your dental appointments. And to learn more about cancer prevention, be sure to visit www.preventcancer.org.

April, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Management strategies for oral potentially malignant disorders

Source: www.medscape.com
Author: Joel M. Laudenbach, DMD

Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) include oral leukoplakia (OL), oral erythroplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, oral lichen planus, proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, and actinic keratosis. Once an OPMD has been clinically diagnosed, execution of management strategy is critical. When formulating the strategy, healthcare providers should consider histopathology, lesion characteristics (ie, surface texture, unifocal, multifocal), lesion location in the mouth (ie, tongue, floor of mouth), patient risk factor assessment, and a detailed medical/cancer history.

In this newly published article, Nadeau and Kerr[1] detail various parameters surrounding evaluation and management of OPMDs. The authors make it clear that OPMDs are challenging, each with their own nuances regarding risk for malignant transformation. For example, when OL is unifocal, nonhomogeneous, nodular, or verrucous, there is a much higher chance of the OL becoming dysplastic (12.63-fold) or demonstrating a focus of carcinoma (8.9-fold) when compared with homogeneous types of OLs.[1]

Provider knowledge of these variables is critical when counseling patients about their diagnosis and management options and when selecting interventions along with follow-up care. Although progression to malignancy is difficult to predict with OPMDs, clinicians can account for multiple risk factors such as smoking/alcohol status, high-risk location in the oral cavity, and size of lesion (>200 mm2) to help formulate a tailored management plan for each patient. Consultation with an oral pathologist to discuss the histologic appearance in the context of specific patient history and lesion characteristics can provide additional perspective and/or recommendations.

Modifiable oral cavity cancer risks related to tobacco and heavy alcohol use should be communicated to patients with OPMDs so that they are able to make changes that may lead to regression/disappearance of certain lesions such as OL. Providers confronted with patients who use tobacco and/or heavy alcohol can integrate recommendations for cessation of tobacco[2] and alcohol[3] because they are both established, independent, causative agents for oral cavity cancer and OPMDs.

Available treatment strategies for OPMDs include surgical removal/ablation, photodynamic therapy, and surveillance. The authors make a clear point with supportive studies that traditional surgical excision of dysplastic OPMDs may decrease malignant transformation (MT) risk, yet it does not fully eliminate that risk and, in some instances, has not changed the MT risk when compared with surveillance alone. Appropriate surgical margin identification for OPMDs is clinically challenging. The authors note that smaller excisional margin sizes (1-2 mm) without marginal histologic assessment are common surgical management goals for OPMDs.[1]

Viewpoint
Nadeau and Kerr carefully outline updated considerations for all OPMDs. Healthcare providers involved in screening, diagnosing, referring, and/or managing patients with OPMDs should be well versed in standards of care, including baseline biopsy goals, tobacco/alcohol cessation, currently available interventions, and surveillance care.

Clinicians should also develop a local team of practitioners who are experts in diagnosis and management of OPMDs to help patients obtain the best opportunity for positive outcomes. I encourage readers with interest to retrieve and review the full article by Nadeau and Kerr as a strategy to update your knowledge base and to continue to improve overall morbidity, mortality, and survival rates related to OPMDs.

References:
1. Nadeau C, Kerr AR. Evaluation and management of oral potentially malignant disorders. Dent Clin North Am. 2018;62:1-27.

2. US Preventive Services Task Force. Final recommendation statement. Tobacco smoking cessation in adults, including pregnant women: behavioral and pharmacotherapy interventions. September 2015. https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/RecommendationStatementFinal/tobacco-use-in-adults-and-pregnant-women-counseling-and-interventions1 Accessed March 1, 2018.

3. US Preventive Services Task Force. Final recommendation statement. Alcohol misuse: screening and behavioral counseling interventions in primary care. May 2013. https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document
/RecommendationStatementFinal/alcohol-misuse-screening-and-behavioral-counseling-interventions-in-primary-care Accessed March 1, 2018.

March, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Non-smokers with oral precancerous lesions at increased risk of cancer

Source: www.eurekalert.org
Author: press release

Precancerous lesions in the mouths of non-smokers are more likely to progress to cancer than those in smokers, new research from the University of British Columbia has found.

Although tobacco use is still one of the strongest risk factors associated with mouth cancers, UBC dentistry PhD candidate Leigha Rock found that oral precancerous lesions in non-smokers are more than twice as likely to progress to cancer. Furthermore, lesions in non-smokers progressed to cancer faster than smoking-associated lesions. The study was published this week in Oral Oncology.

“This is the first published study where the main focus was to examine the difference in risk of progression to oral cancer between non-smokers and smokers with oral precancerous lesions,” said Rock, lead author of the study. “While other studies have also reported a higher rate of transformation among non-smokers, we looked at multiple risk factors including genetic markers.”

Rock and colleagues looked at case history of 445 patients with oral epithelial dysplasia (OED), a type of precancerous oral lesion, enrolled in the B.C. Oral Cancer Prediction Longitudinal study. One-third of the patients were non-smokers.

“As smoking rates decline, we are seeing an increase in the proportion of these types of lesions in non-smokers,” said Rock.

Among the scientists’ findings were that lesions on the floor of the mouth in non-smokers were 38 times more likely to progress to cancer than in smokers. The study is also the first to report on quicker progression to cancer in non-smokers: both three-year and five-year rates of progression were seven per cent and 6.5 per cent higher than smokers, respectively.

The researchers suggest that the marked difference in outcomes is due to a difference in the root causes of the lesions. In smokers, the OED is likely the result of environmental factors, whereas in non-smokers, genetic susceptibility or mutations are likely to blame.

“Our findings show that molecular genomic markers can identify high risk lesions, regardless of risky habits like smoking, and should be an important consideration in patient management,” said Rock.

The study’s results stress the importance of taking oral lesions seriously, especially when they occur in non-smokers: “If you see a lesion in a smoker, be worried. If you see a lesion in a non-smoker, be very worried. Don’t assume it can’t be cancer because they’re a non-smoker; our research indicates non-smokers may be at higher risk.”

March, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Dentists may soon start asking about your sex life in a bid to control staggering HPV rates

Source: www.dailymail.co.uk
Author: Jaleesa Baulkman for DailyMail.com

Your dentist may be interested in more than just your flossing habits, but for a good reason. Dentists and dental hygienists are being encouraged to assess patients’ risk of developing oral cancers from HPV, the most common sexually-transmitted disease.

According to experts, they will likely skirt around the topic of their patients’ sex life and ask about potential symptoms of cancer like jaw pain and swelling.

But a new report published in the Journal of the American Dental Association insists it is imperative that dentists to play a more active role in detecting the disease, which is linked to seven types of cancer.

‘What we’re going to find over time is that HPV is going to be a more common cause of cancer over time,’ Ellen Daley, a public health professor at the University of South Florida, told Daily Mail Online. ‘We need to worry about how to prevent it.’

HPV is responsible for about 70 percent of oropharyngeal cancers in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The most common sexually transmitted infection in the US, it affects more than half of American adults. In fact, Dr Daley says it’s as common as the common cold.

However, asking about a patient’s sex life isn’t necessary to preventing HPV-related oral cancers.

‘If [dentists] want to [ask patient’s about their sex life], they can, Dr Daley explained. ‘But that’s not relevant since HPV is so common. We need to get pass how it’s transmitted and worry about preventing cancers.’

There have been nearly 16,000 annual cases of oropharyngeal cancers — cancer of the tongue, tonsils and pharyngeal wall — between 2008 and 2012, with HPV being the cause of approximately 72 percent of those diagnoses, according to data.

For the study, Dr Daley and her team conducted four focus groups with a total of 33 dentists.

Research showed that most dentists knew HPV was a risk factor for oropharyngeal cancer, but several were not sure about what causes HPV-related oral cancer.

The study found that many dentists don’t know how to approach the subject of HPV and lack the communication skills needed to educate patients effectively.

Most dentists said they were concerned their patients would think they were judging their personal behaviors. In other words, asking patient’s about their sex lives is out of the question. However, dentists and dental hygienists are trained to screen for oral cancers.

Examining the area under the tongue and looking in the back of a patients’ mouth are ways dentists screen for oral cancer. However, HPV-related oral cancers are difficult to detect because they develop in the throat at the back of the tongue, or in the folds of the tonsils, according to the American Dental Association.

HPV oral and oropharyngeal cancers are harder to discover than tobacco related cancers because the symptoms are not always obvious to the individual who is developing the disease, or to professionals that are looking for it. They can be very subtle and painless

HPV, which is transmitted through vaginal, anal and oral sex, is the most commonly sexually transmitted infection in the US, according to the CDC, affecting more than 79 million Americans. There are more than 40 types of HPV that can affect the mouth and genitals, but HPV 16 and 18 are the two most common cancer-causing types. According to the CDC, HPV type 16 is responsible for 60 percent of all oropharyngeal cancers. Non-cancer types of HPV can cause warts in the mouth or throat.

Some symptoms to look out for include, a persistent sore throat, earaches, enlarged lymph nodes, unexplained weight loss and painful swallowing. However, some people have no signs or symptoms, according to the CDC.

The HPV vaccine, which is administered to children aged nine and 12 years old in the US and the UK, is a preventive measure against HPV and HPV-related cancers. The vaccine is offered as a three doses in the US, and two doses in the UK. Condoms and dental dams also serve as protective barriers against the disease.

January, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew not safe substitutes for cigarettes

Source: www.bnd.com
Author: staff

As many people are aware, the use of any type of tobacco can lead to major health risks. Many individuals think using smokeless tobacco or chew can be a safe substitute for cigarettes.

A mock model of how dangerous and destructive tobacco products, specifically smokeless tobacco, can be to someone’s health and well-being. Navy photo by Douglas H. Stutz, Naval Hospital Bremerton Public Affairs

Tobacco companies often lead people to believe this; however, this is not true. There is no proof that any smokeless tobacco products help smokers quit smoking.

Smokeless tobacco has four times the amount of nicotine than a cigarette and also contains 30 chemicals known to cause cancers.

A few of these cancers include mouth, tongue, cheek, and gum cancer. Additionally, cancer can be found in the esophagus and pancreas. Along with these health risks there are other problems, including mouth and teeth problems and tooth loss.

Many studies have shown that high rates of leukoplakia in the mouth were found where individuals hold the chew.

Leukoplakia is a white patch in the mouth that could potentially turn into cancer. The white patches, sometimes called sores, within the mouth cannot be scraped off but usually do not cause pain. The longer the use of oral tobacco, the more prone an individual is to develop leukoplakia.

Stopping tobacco use usually allows leukoplakia to heal, however, treatment may be needed if there are signs of early cancer. Along with these issues, there are many others such as bad breath, teeth stains, receding gums, gum disease, cavities and tooth decay.

As well as the health risks one is providing for themselves, children, pets and animals can also suffer health risks from tobacco substances. Children, pets and animals often mistake these substances for candy, gum or something they should put in their mouth.

Ingesting smokeless tobacco can lead to nicotine poisoning and even death. Most children affected by this are under the age of 6 and more than 70 percent are under 1 year of age according to a study in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Smokeless tobacco affects everyone.

November, 2017|Oral Cancer News|