tobacco

Global oral cancer rapid test kit market headed for growth and global expansion by 2016 – 2024

Source: ww.medgadget.com
Author: staff, Persistence Market Research

Oral cancer is one of the largest group of cancers, which comes under category of Head and Neck cancer. It includes lips, tongue, throat, sinuses, and floor of the mouth. About 90% of the oral cancers are squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). According to the Oral Cancer Foundation in 2016, around 48,250 people are diagnosed with oral cancer in the U.S. and has relatively low survival rates. The death rates due to oral cancer are relatively higher due to lack of proper diagnosis test, which can detect oral cancer at the early stage. Hence, early stage diagnosis is an alternative solution that helps prevent the deaths of people infected by oral cancer. The Conventional diagnostic tests available in the market are time-consuming and costly. Currently, very few technologies are available in the market for routine screening of the oral cancers. Hence, companies are trying to develop the Oral Cancer Rapid Testing Kit (OCRTK), which can detect the stage of cancer effectively in less time to perform test at home/clinic. Vigilant biosciences developed ‘OncAlert Oral Cancer LAB Test’, which is accurate, cost effective, and uses non-invasive technology. This technology also got the CE mark in Europe that enables this product to sell all over Europe. Various companies and universities are trying to develop the rapid detection technology for oral cancer kits to detect oral cancer

The increase in usage of tobacco, which includes smokeless tobacco, HPV-induced cancers, and consumption of alcohol are major factors that drive the growth of the market. Furthermore, increase in awareness and aging population also contribute to the prevalence the oral cancers. According to the cancer research center in U.K, globally over 3,000,000 persons were diagnosed with oral cancer. Smoking is a major factor that is turning many men and women into victims of oral cancer. In U.S., black males are having high incidence rate than their whiter counterparts because of cigarette smoking and heavy alcohol consumption. Lack of new diagnostic technologies in the market is a major factors that is limiting the growth of the OCRTK market.

OCRTK will have higher impact in the oral cancer diagnosis market because currently there very few rapid test kits available in the market to diagnose the oral cancer. Government organizations are actively funding companies that are operating in OCRTK. This highlights the importance of this domain. Factors like low cost, easy process, and instant results are expected to drive the growth of the market.

On the basis of product segmentation, OncAlert Oral Cancer LAB is expected to hold major market shares of the OCRTK market as it is the only available product in the market with clinical effectiveness. On the basis of principle, sensor-based devices will have a relatively higher share due to its highly sensitive nature and precision results.

On the basis of End User, hospitals, and diagnostic centers hold major market share comparatively than the research centers and consumers as mainly all the operations are carried out in hospitals and diagnostic centers. However, in future the end user is expected to shift their preference towards the consumer as companies are developing techniques to perform tests easily at home.

OCRTK market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America and Middle East & Africa. North America is expected to hold relatively high market share due to factors such as growing awareness about the disease and rise in the aging population. However, Asia Pacific region and European regions also might have good market due to increase in incidence of oral cancer.

Some key players in the market are Vigilant Biosciences, Abviris Deutschland GmbH, Insilixa, and University of Sheffield.

On the basis of development of the OCRTK market, startups and universities are more actively working on this domain as compared to the major market players. Hence, there are possibilities of acquisitions and collaborations to take place within these companies/institutes in the near future.

December, 2016|Oral Cancer News|

For this cancer, ‘stage 4’ isn’t as bad as it sounds

Source: www.omaha.com
Author: Steve Hendrix – The Washington Post

Hearing the word “cancer” in a doctor’s office is bad enough. Hearing “stage 4” invokes even more dread. When I learned I had stage 4 HPV-related oral cancer, I didn’t know exactly what it meant, but I knew there wasn’t a stage 5.

Doctors use the standardized staging system to describe the location, size and extent of a cancer and its spread throughout the body. Using data on the treatment and survivability of each particular kind of cancer, clinicians combine these factors to produce a number from stage 1 (a small tumor confined to one spot) to stage 4 (a cancer that has spread, either to a single adjacent lymph node or to distant organs).

My cancer was stage 4A, a small tumor at the base of my tongue that had spread to a single lymph node in my neck.

My doctor immediately tried to soften the blow. There were problems with the staging rules as they applied to this kind of cancer, he said. HPV oropharyngeal cancers, while potentially fatal, were far more treatable than other oral cancers, particularly the ones related to tobacco and alcohol use that were used to define the staging standards.

He was right. A study published in the Lancet early this year found that the current guidelines lead to needless panic for the newly diagnosed. “At the present time, most patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer are told they have (stage 4) disease, but the reality is that their outlook is similar to that of patients with the most curable malignant diseases,” the study authors wrote.

This month, the American Joint Committee on Cancer is releasing new guidelines for HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer staging that will ease patient fears and make it easier for doctors to offer less-invasive treatment options.

“It’s remarkable,” said my own physician, Arjun Joshi of George Washington University. “Under the new system, you would only be a stage 1.”

November, 2016|Oral Cancer News|

Tobacco is OUT! A third of all Major League Baseball stadiums to be free of tobacco

Source: www.dailyastorian.com
Author: American Heart Association News

With the end of this baseball season, so ended the long intertwined history of tobacco and baseball at more than one-third of all Major League stadiums.

The unhealthy coupling started unraveling when it became evident that chewing tobacco resulted in deadly consequences for some players, such as legendary San Diego Padre Tony Gwynn who died of mouth cancer in 2014.

Just months after Gwynn’s death, former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling announced he was being treated for oral cancer.

Although Major League Baseball and the players’ union could not agree to take action, several cities have. Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco all have passed laws prohibiting tobacco use of any kind at sports venues. A statewide law in California will take effect before the 2017 season begins.

This week, the Washington, D.C. City Council gave final approval to a measure that would end the use of all tobacco products – including smokeless tobacco like chew, dip and snuff – at all organized sporting events within the city, including Nationals Park.

Councilmember Yvette Alexander said the move is needed to help protect children, who often look to sports professionals as role models, from taking up the habit. The measure will now be sent to Mayor Muriel Bowser to sign into law.

Additionally, on Oct. 20, St. Petersburg, Florida, City Council Vice Chair Darden Rice introduced a proposal to ban smokeless tobacco products from the city’s athletic venues. The proposal includes Tropicana Stadium, the home of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. Rice said she hopes the proposal would clear before the start of the 2017 season.

Legislation is also currently under consideration in Toronto and the state of Minnesota.

“Our national pastime should be about promoting a healthy and active lifestyle, not a deadly and addictive product,” said Matthew L. Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

November, 2016|Oral Cancer News|

Smokeless Tobacco Use and the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer: Pooled Analysis of US Studies in the INHANCE Consortium.

Source: www.pubmed.gov
Author: Wyss AB, Gillison ML, Olshan AF

Abstract

Previous studies on smokeless tobacco use and head and neck cancer (HNC) have found inconsistent and often imprecise estimates, with limited control for cigarette smoking. Using pooled data from 11 US case-control studies (1981-2006) of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers (6,772 cases and 8,375 controls) in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) Consortium, we applied hierarchical logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for ever use, frequency of use, and duration of use of snuff and chewing tobacco separately for never and ever cigarette smokers. Ever use (versus never use) of snuff was strongly associated with HNC among never cigarette smokers (odds ratio (OR) = 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08, 2.70), particularly for oral cavity cancers (OR = 3.01, 95% CI: 1.63, 5.55). Although ever (versus never) tobacco chewing was weakly associated with HNC among never cigarette smokers (OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.77), analyses restricted to cancers of the oral cavity showed a stronger association (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.17). Few or no associations between each type of smokeless tobacco and HNC were observed among ever cigarette smokers, possibly reflecting residual confounding by smoking. Smokeless tobacco use appears to be associated with HNC, especially oral cancers, with snuff being more strongly associated than chewing tobacco.

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.

*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.  

October, 2016|Oral Cancer News|

Recognizing oral carcinoma

Source: nurse-practitioners-and-physician-assistants.advanceweb.com
Author: Amber Crossley, MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC

Oral carcinoma is identified as one of the top ten cancers worldwide, accounting for nearly 2% to 5% of all cancer cases.1, 2 In 2014, there were an estimated 42,440 new cases of oral and pharyngeal carcinoma.

Males have a greater risk of developing the disease compared to females.2 Black males in particular are amongst the highest at-risk group for developing oral carcinoma.2 Oral carcinoma typically develops after the age of 50, with the majority of cases occurring between the ages of 60 and 70.2 When initially diagnosed with oral carcinoma, more than 50% of people will have metastases.3

The most common causes of oral carcinoma are related to tobacco use and alcohol consumption.4 In fact, 75% of all cases of oral carcinoma may be caused by the combination of tobacco and alcohol use.4

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However, it has also been extrapolated that chronic trauma to the oral mucosa, such as in the case of ill-fitting dentures or the consumption of high-temperature foods, is a leading modifiable risk factor for oral carcinoma.1,5 Dietary deficiencies of vitamins A, C, E, selenium, and folates may also contribute to the development of malignant cancerous lesions in the oral cavity.6

While cases of oral carcinoma have decreased over the last few years in the United States, oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in incidence.4 The rise in cases of oropharyngeal cancer may be related to viral and infectious diseases; however, the mechanisms are largely unclear. Some of these infections and viruses include human papilloma virus (HPV), periodontitis, candida albicans, syphilis and herpes simplex virus.7 However, for the purposes of this case presentation, only oral cavity cancer will be discussed.

A Non-Healing Oral Lesion
MC is an 82-year-old white female who visited her primary care provider’s office complaining of a mouth sore. The sore was present for approximately six months, and grew increasingly painful.

She has worn dentures for more than 10 years, and was accustomed to the typical soreness with irritation sometimes associated with everyday denture use. With this particular occurrence, the soreness lingered in the same area and lasted longer than any previous experience.

MC attempted to alleviate the soreness with an existing prescription for hydrocodone. This treatment proved unsuccessful. MC scheduled an appointment with her primary care provider, as she assumed the pain was the result of ill-fitting dentures.

At MC’s initial appointment, the provider noticed a 7mm erythematous lesion on the lower interior aspect of her right molar, and suggested it could be the result of her ill-fitting dentures. Because MC had exhausted her hydrocodone, the provider prescribed tramadol and a viscous lidocaine suspension for pain. She was told to follow-up with her dentist once the sore completely healed in order to be fitted with new dentures. She was instructed to refrain from denture use until the sore had resolved. There were no further follow-up instructions given.

One week after the initial visit, MC returned to the primary care provider’s office because of increasing pain and discomfort. During this visit, the provider noted the sore had ulcerated edges that were friable and showed little improvement. She was referred immediately to an otolaryngologist for the suspicion of carcinoma of the oral cavity.

Patient History
MC is an 82-year-old widow. She is a Medicare recipient living in government-subsidized housing for the elderly. MC smoked tobacco between the ages of 17 and 52 at a rate of 1.5 packs per day, or 53 pack years. During the same 35 year time frame, she drank 1 to 2 alcoholic beverages daily.

Over the past 10 years, she lost a total of 40 pounds without any lifestyle modifications to justify the weight loss. At the time of MC’s initial primary care visit, she weighed 91 pounds. Additional patient history included hypothyroidism, mitral stenosis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, coronary artery disease, arthritis and hypertension.

Clinical Features
Oral carcinoma is defined as cancer involving the floor of the mouth, hard palate, buccal mucosa, interior tongue, retromolar trigone, or alveolar ridge.8 Premalignant oral carcinoma may present as a painless white patch known as leukoplakia, or a painful reddened patch identified as erythroplakia.9 In addition to the aforementioned signs, the cervical lymph nodes may be enlarged.10 Any erythroplakia or leukoplakia lesions that appear to be non-healing in an older individual should be deemed suspicious.10

Differential Diagnosis

Refer to the table below to help you rule out other conditions.

table

Diagnosis
Early identification of oral carcinoma offers patients the greatest chance for successful treatment and survival following diagnosis.5

An initial patient history that includes tobacco use, alcohol consumption, sexual practices, denture use, oral trauma, infections of the oral cavity and a history of present illness should be obtained.8 It is important to understand that patients complaining of ill-fitting dentures are four times more likely to develop an oral lesion that is cancerous.5

Oral lesions caused by trauma increase the likelihood of carcinogen absorption from tobacco and alcohol in the oral mucosa. This absorption may disrupt the deoxyribonucleic acid of the mucosal cells.1

Following a thorough history, the provider can perform a complete head and neck examination. During oral cavity inspection, a mirror and fiberoptic exam should also be performed.8 A combination of inspection and palpation for lumps or abnormalities within the tissue of the oral mucosa is the definitive mechanism used to screen for oral cancer as identified by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.4 In the presence of a potentially cancerous oral lesion, a surgical biopsy should be completed to confirm a diagnosis of oral carcinoma.9

Imaging studies can be used to detect and identify metastases of oral carcinoma. Computed tomography is the preferred imaging study performed at the site of the primary tumor.11 This study can identify the extent of the tumor, as well as lymph node involvement.10,12 Additionally, a chest x-ray is recommended in order to determine whether or not the oral carcinoma originated in the lungs or metastasized to the lungs. The lungs are the primary site for metastases of oral carcinoma.12 More than 90% of oral cavity cancers are considered to be squamous cell carcinoma.11

Laboratory studies should also be considered in addition to imaging studies. Serum ferritin, alpha anti-trypsin, and alpha-antiglycoprotein levels can be elevated in patients with advanced cancer of the head or neck region.12 Laboratory studies alone cannot determine the presence of oral carcinoma. However, they can aide in identifying the extent and progression of the cancer.12

Case Outcome
A surgical biopsy was performed in order to identify the causative organism. MC was diagnosed with stage IV malignant squamous cell carcinoma of the right retromolar trigone, as well as squamous cell carcinoma of the right middle and lower lobe of the lung. The patient had no lymph node involvement.

Because of her increased age and nutritional status, MC did not qualify for multimodal treatment. Instead, she is being treated with aggressive radiation therapy over a period of 12 weeks.

Understanding key factors related to MC’s case — increased age, history of tobacco and alcohol use, and ill-fitting dentures — is paramount when identifying the painful, non-healing, 7 mm lesion in her oral cavity as a potential diagnosis of oral carcinoma.

Implications for Practice
Due to the increase in oral health disparities, the Institute of Medicine released a report revealing a new demand for non-dental health care providers to perform screenings for oral diseases as well as offering prevention advice and referral to preventative services.13

Increasing interprofessional collaboration amongst dentists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, physicians and medical students has shown to be effective in implementing the head, ears, eyes, nose, oral cavity, and throat (HEENOT) assessment into practice.14 While this is similar to the head, ears, eyes, nose and throat assessment, it allows for the integration of the oral cavity into the evaluation of the head and neck exam.

One study, conducted between 2008 and 2014 at New York University, revealed that the result of HEENOT implementation led to 500 patient referrals to dental clinics for suspicious oral lesions.14 Preventative measures at the primary care level should focus on the greatest risk factors (tobacco use, alcohol consumption and ill-fitting dentures).

Research has shown that due to the sometimes vague and misleading symptoms of early-onset oral carcinoma, a diagnosis may be prolonged by up to 6 months.12 Although screening for oral cancer in healthy individuals without risk factors may not be beneficial, evidence supports oral screenings by primary care providers for high-risk patients.3, 4, 15

Given the fact that only 30% of patients ages 65 years and older have dental insurance coverage, the primary care provider must screen patients who present with many risk factors for oral carcinoma.14,16 Because there are a greater number of primary care providers in comparison to dentists, they have the potential to increase awareness and detection of oral carcinoma.16

While the leading cause for oral carcinoma is tobacco use, it is recommended that the primary care provider encourage patients who use tobacco to employ smoking cessation products.4 Second, the primary care provider should educate patients on the harmful effects of daily alcohol use.12 Third, providers should stress to patients the importance of regular dental check-ups and denture fittings as an essential tool for maintaining good oral health.5

Note:
Amber Crossley practices as an advanced registered nurse practitioner in Jacksonville, Florida.

References
1. Piemonte ED, et al. Relationship between chronic trauma or the oral mucosa, oral potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer. J Oral Pathol Med. 2010;39(7):513-517.

2. National Cancer Institute. Stat fact sheets: oral cavity and pharynx cancer. http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/oralcav.html.

3. Rethman MP, et al. Evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding screening for oral squamous cell carcinoma. JADA. 2010;141(5):509-520.

4. U.S. Preventative Services Task Force. Oral cancer: screening. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/oral-cancer-screening1

5. Manoharan S, et al. Ill-fitting dentures and oral cancer: a meta-analysis. Oral Oncol. 2014;50(11):1058-1061.

6. Freedman ND, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and head and neck cancer risk in a large United States prospective cohort study. Int J Cancer. 2008;122(1):2330-2336.

7. Meurman JH. Infectious and dietary risk factors of oral cancer. Oral Oncol. 2010;46(6):411-413.

8. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Head and neck cancers. http://oralcancerfoundation.org/treatment/pdf/head-and-neck.pdf

9. Jefferson GD. Adult with oral cavity lesion. AAO-HNSF Patient Month Program. 2011;40(5): 1-25.

10. Arya S, et al. Head and neck symposium: imaging in oral cancers. Indian J Radiol Imaging. 2012.22(3):195-208.

11. Akram S, et al. Emerging patterns in clinico-pathological spectrum of oral cancers. Pak J Med Sci. 2013;29(3):783-787.

12. Scully C. Cancers of the oral mucosa. Medscape. 2016. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1075729-overview

13. Institute of Medicine. Improving access to oral health care for vulnerable and underserved populations. https://www.iom.edu/Reports/2011/Improving-Access-to-Oral-Health-Care-for-Vulnerable-and-Underserved-Populations/Report-Brief.aspx.

14. Haber JH, et al. Putting the mouth back in the head: HEENT to HEENOT. Am J Public Health. 2015;105(3):437-441.

15. American Family Physician. Screening for the early detection and prevention of oral cancer. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0501/p1047.html

16. Cohon LA. Expanding the physician’s role in addressing the oral health of adults. Am J Public Health. 2013;103(3);408-412.

October, 2016|Oral Cancer News|

Rodeo Competitors Fight Smokeless Tobacco Use at Laramie Jubilee Days

Source: www.y95country.com
Author: Nick Learned

Cody Kiser and Carly Twisselman

Two professional rodeo contestants will ride exclusively for the Oral Cancer Foundation this weekend as part of Laramie Jubilee Days with a goal of preventing young fans from using smokeless tobacco.

Cody Kiser and Carly Twisselman each aim to show rodeo fans, particularly the younger ones, chewing or using other forms of smokeless tobacco isn’t what makes them who they are. They promote the Foundation’s campaign which uses the slogan “Be Smart. Don’t Start.”

Their approach is anything but confrontational or aggressive. Rather than encouraging people to quit, they hope to encourage young fans to never pick up the habit in the first place. And where some rely on statistics to make the point, Kiser and Twisselman take a different approach. Simply giving attention to young rodeo fans is a big part of getting their message across.

“Its not the facts that they’re going to take home,” Kiser says. “Everybody knows that tobacco’s bad; you can get cancer and you can die. But the biggest impact that I see is just acknowledging those kids or acknowledging those people in the audience that want to know more, and you can show them what you can do without tobacco.”

“I’m not out there to tell anybody how to live their life or preach to them about needing to quit,” Kiser says.

“It’s not our place to do that,” Twisselman says. “People most of the time aren’t going to listen when you tell them something like that anyway.”

The pair will be wearing Oral Cancer Foundation gear and handing out buttons, wristbands and bandanas bearing campaign messaging.

As they travel the rodeo circuit, Kiser and Twisselman each say they often see other riders use various types of smokeless tobacco such as chew and snuff.

“It’s very common,” says Kiser. “You see it everywhere.”

“One of my traveling partners, he started when he was in high school. He was just around it all the time,” says Kiser. “It was just the ‘cowboy’ thing to do, I guess.”

“A lot of people are very respectful about it,” Twisselman says. “They’ll see me in my shirt and be like ‘oh yeah, you represent the Oral Cancer Foundation’ and they’ll spit their chew out. I think that in itself is a positive side effect of it.”

“I think a large part of a lot of these cowboys is, it’s the cowboy thing to do, so they start doing it,” Kiser says. “And that’s where I want to step in and show the younger generation that you don’t have to chew to be a cowboy. You can be a cowboy athlete and not chew and treat your body as best you can, because what we do is very difficult and it’s hard on the body.”

“A lot of folks started when they young,” Kiser says. “And I’ve talked to guys who started chewing later in life and they can’t quit, or it’s hard for them. It’s a vicious thing.”

*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

Rodeo outreach program fights oral cancer

Source: www.olivesoftware.com
Author: Stewart M. Green

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Carly Twisselman, a spokesperson with the Oral Cancer Foundation’s rodeo outreach program, and her horse Chanel travel the Western rodeo circuit and talk with kids about the dangers of using spit tobacco. Photo by Stewart M. Green

Carly Twisselman brushed her horse Chanel outside a stall at the Norris-Penrose Event Center, home of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo, which will roll into town July 13-16. “I’ve been rodeoing my whole life,” she said. “Now I do it at the professional level. This is my rookie year so I’m going really hard. I want to win the rookie title.”

Summer is the busiest time of the year for cowgirls and cowboys. “We call it Cowboy Christmas, the 4th of July run,” she said. Twisselman and her travel partner have recently competed in Utah, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, and just drove up from Pecos, Texas, to Colorado Springs for qualifiers. “It’s a crazy time,” she said. “Lots of traveling, but lots of money to be won.”

Twisselman, a 30-year-old barrel racer, grew up on a ranch near San Luis Obispo on the central California coast. “My family’s been ranching there for seven generations,” she said. “I was on the back of a horse all the time. I was riding before I could walk.”

While growing up in the Western ranching and rodeo culture, Twisselman was aware of the widespread use of spit tobacco by cowboys. “I’ve been around it my whole life and seen a lot of things that were negative and I was affected by it.”

Rodeo and tobacco have a long history together. Starting in 1986, the U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company sponsored the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association until the association ended its partnership with tobacco advertisers in 2009. Tobacco use, however, still thrives with cowboys and spectators at rodeos.

In 2014, the Oral Cancer Foundation, a nonprofit organization that supports prevention, education and research of oral cancer, reached out to pro rodeo athletes to spread the word about the dangers of tobacco use, with Cody Kiser, a bareback bronc rider, as their first rodeo spokesperson. This past year they added Carly Twisselman to continue creating awareness in the rodeo community.

“Honestly, it was God that they came to me,” said Twisselman. “Their goal was to reach rodeo people, people in the Western culture and people that were horse lovers because tobacco is a huge problem in rodeo.” The foundation asked Twisselman to be a spokesperson and she gladly accepted. “It’s an amazing thing to represent such a great organization. I can take this rodeo platform where I’m in front of thousands of people and use it for good.” While the Oral Cancer Foundation wants to help adults with tobacco problems, its rodeo focus is on children. According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 9.9 percent of high school-age boys use spit tobacco nationwide, while 10.5 percent of men ages 18-25 use it. Usage is higher in rural states like Wyoming, Montana and West Virginia. A can of spit tobacco packs as much nicotine as 40 cigarettes, and a 30-minute chew is like smoking three cigarettes, making addiction to spit tobacco one of the hardest to break. Spit tobacco, including smokeless tobacco, dip, snuff, chew and chewing tobacco, can cause gum disease, tooth decay and oral cancer. Almost 50,000 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer in 2016.

“We aren’t telling people they should stop,” Twisselman said, “but we show people why it’s not good to use tobacco. If someone is chewing, I’m not going to go lecture them.”

Twisselman and Kiser focus on helping kids make positive choices about tobacco use. “Kids look up to us as idols and if they see us doing good and not chewing tobacco then maybe they won’t either,” Twisselman said. “Our message is: ‘Be Smart, Don’t Start.’”

Twisselman also attends junior rodeos where she hands out wristbands, bandanas, pins, and buttons. “Kids love the freebies,” she said. She also wears Oral Cancer Foundation logos on her competition shirts.

Surprisingly, some rodeo women chew tobacco. “It’s not the problem it is with the men,” Twisselman said, “but I do see it. I find it really repulsive. Sometimes women who chew will see me and say, “Oh, you work with oral cancer” and they’ll take their chew out and throw it away because they don’t want to be disrespectful to me.”

Twisselman said she and Kiser are making a difference, noting people are becoming more educated about the dangers of throat cancer from chewing tobacco and learning that it’s not a healthy habit. “We’ve only been doing this for a year now and we’re still getting our feet wet,” she said. “It’s hard to know if fewer kids are chewing now but I’m getting the word out and interacting with them. Because we take the time to talk with kids and give them the little gifts, it has a huge impact on them.”

To learn more about oral cancer and its prevention, medical research, education and for patient support, then visit oralcancer.org.

*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

Rodeo rider partners with nonprofit group to fight smokeless tobacco use

Source: www.fox13now.com
Author: Rebecca Cade
 

SALT LAKE CITY — Oral cancer is becoming an epidemic in the U.S., and has been in the news in the last year with the loss of major league baseball hall-of-famer, Tony Gwynn, who died at 54 from smokeless tobacco use.

Rodeo has a historic tie to smokeless tobaccos, and Oral Cancer Foundation, has teamed up with Bareback Rider Cody Kiser to draw awareness to, and prevent, this growing epidemic where it thrives – the rodeo circuit.

Smokeless/spit tobacco is one of the historic causes of deadly oral cancers, and is more addictive than other forms of tobacco use.

The nonprofit is seeking to spread awareness of oral cancer and the dangers of starting terrible tobacco habits. While others are focused on getting users to quit, The Oral Cancer Foundation is reaching out to young people to not pick up the habit that they may see one of their rodeo “heroes” engage in.

Their message is simple, “Be Smart. Don’t Start.”

With the strong addictive powers of smokeless tobacco, the foundation and Kiser aim to engage fans early.

At the rodeos, Kiser will be solely wearing OCF logos and wording, while handing out buttons, wristbands and bandanas with the campaign messaging on them. The bareback rider hopes this will make him an alternative positive role-model for the adolescent age group whose minds are so easily molded.

“It’s something I’ve always been passionate about, so when I got into the partnership with OCF, it was no big deal to be able to say ‘I don’t smoke or chew, never have, and it’s easy not to,'” Kiser said.

Kiser added it all starts with kids.

“Most of these guys I ride with started smoking and chewing in sixth or seventh grade,” he said. “So, if we can get to those kids now, and tell them ‘you don’t have to do this to be cool or be a cowboy’ and show them what you can do without it.”

More information on the campaign can be found at www.oralcancer.org

*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

Rodeo rider raising awareness of chewing tobacco and oral cancer

Source: www.krcrtv.com
Author: Danielle Radin

 

chewing-JPG

REDDING, Calif. – The Redding Rodeo kicked off Wednesday night with events like barrel racing, cattle roping and mutton busting.

Professional barrel racer, Carly Twisselman said chewing tobacco is prominent at rodeos. She’s teamed up with the Oral Cancer Foundation to try to change that.

“We want to show children that you can follow your dreams, be who you want to be, pursue being a rodeo athlete and not chew tobacco,” said Twisselman.

Twisselman competes in rodeos across the country and sees chewing tobacco time and time again.

She’s teaching children chewing tobacco is not the ‘cool thing to do.’ She also wears letting on her sleeves every race that reads, “Be smart, don’t start.”

She also has a brother who chews and had a health scare from it.

“My brother’s had signs of cancer of the mouth from chewing,” said Twisselman. ”  “I just think that’s the wrong message we should be sending to this children.”

According to the oral cancer foundation, there will be about 48,000 new cases of oral cancer in 2016 in the United States. 75 percent of all oral cancer patients use tobacco.

They estimate nearly 10,000 people in the United States will die from oral cancer in 2016.