HPV

Restaging raises hope against HPV oral cancer

Source: atlantajewishtimes.timesofisrael.com
Author: Cady Schulman

Jason Mendelsohn was diagnosed with Stage 4 tonsil cancer from HPV in 2014 after finding just one bump on his neck. He survived thanks to a variety of treatments, including a radical tonsillectomy and neck dissection to remove 42 lymph nodes, seven weeks of chemotherapy, radiation and a feeding tube.

But if Mendelsohn’s cancer had been discovered today, just four years later, it would have been classified as Stage 1. That’s because HPV-related oral cancers now have a high survival rate through a better response to treatment, said Meryl Kaufman, a speech pathologist specializing in head and neck cancer management who worked for Emory University’s department of head and neck surgery for 10 years.

“Cancer staging is taking into account the HPV-related cancers,” said Kaufman, who now owns her own practice. “It was kind of all lumped together. The survival rates for people who have HPV-related cancers are much higher than the typical head and neck cancers associated with smoking and drinking.”

For Mendelsohn, finding out that patients with HPV-related cancers likely face easier treatments and higher success rates made him extremely happy.

“If I was diagnosed and I heard Stage 1 instead of Stage 4, while it’s still cancer, it would make me feel like I could beat it,” said Mendelsohn, who made a video for his children a month after his diagnosis with advice for their lives after he was gone. “When I hear Stage 4 to Stage 1, I think people have hope they can beat it. My hope is that it will give people hope that they can beat this.”

As a cancer survivor, the Florida resident wants to give hope to other patients. He talks to people throughout the world every month and is creating a worldwide survivor patient network to connect cancer survivors with patients.

“While cancer is scary, Stage 1 is a lot less scary than Stage 4,” Mendelsohn said. “Stage 4 was overwhelming. When I was looking for information, there was nothing out there that made me feel like I was going to be OK. What I’m trying to do is give people hope and let them know that it’s all temporary.”

Another way Mendelsohn is trying to reach those affected by cancer is through his website, supermanhpv.com. He shares his story, news articles featuring him and oral cancer caused by HPV, and information for survivors, patients and caregivers.

The site also features Mendelsohn’s blog, putting himself out there so people can see that someone who, just four years ago, was diagnosed with Sage 4 cancer is now a Peloton-riding, travel-loving cancer advocate.

“People see me and say (they) can’t believe (I) had cancer three to four years ago,” Mendelsohn said. “I was in bed 18 hours a day for a month. I was choking on my saliva for a month. I was consuming five Ensures a day and two Gatorades a day through a feeding tube in my stomach. If people going through that can see me working out, going on the bourbon tour in Louisville. I’ve been on an Alaskan cruise. I’ve been to the Caribbean. I’ve been to the Grand Canyon.”

Mendelsohn, who started his campaign to raise awareness of HPV and oral cancer by raising money for the Ride to Conquer Cancer in Washington, now serves on the board of the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance. The organization’s goal is to advance prevention, detection, treatment and rehabilitation of oral, head and neck cancers through public awareness, research, advocacy and survivorship.

“I feel like it’s gone from me raising money for a bike ride to me on two boards helping create awareness and raise inspiration and creating a survivor patient network,” Mendelsohn said. “Now it’s not about me and my three doctors. Now it’s about helping people with diagnosis globally. There are great doctors. I think we’re going to do great things.”

One way to help prevent children from getting cancer caused by HPV when they grow up is the Gardasil vaccine, which protects against HPV Strain 16, which causes oral cancer. Mendelsohn said 62 percent of college freshmen and three-quarters of adults by age 30 have HPV.

But he doesn’t tell people to get the vaccine. Instead, he advises parents to talk to their kids’ doctors about the benefits and risks.

“I talk about the importance of oral cancer screenings when they’re at the dentist,” he said. “And if you feel a bump on your neck, go to your ENT. I had no symptoms and just a bump on my neck, but I was diagnosed with Stage 4. I’ve had so many tell me that they didn’t know the vaccine is for boys. They thought it was just for girls.”

Kaufman said that the HPV vaccine is recommended for use in boys and girls and that it’s important for the vaccine to be given before someone becomes sexually active. The vaccine won’t work if a person has already been exposed to HPV, as most sexually active adults have been, she said.

Men are much more likely to get head and neck cancer from HPV.

“Usually your body fights off the virus itself, but in some people it turns into cancer,” Kaufman said. There hasn’t been specific research that the HPV vaccine will protect you from head and neck cancer, she said, “but if you’re protected against the strains of HPV that cause the cancer, you’re probably less likely to get head and neck cancer.”

Treatment for this cancer isn’t easy, Kaufman said. Radiation to the head and neck can affect salivary glands, which can cause long-term dental and swallowing issues. Treatment can affect the skin, taste and the ability to swallow.

“A lot of people have tubes placed,” she said. “It’s not easy. It depends on how well you respond to the treatment.”

While getting the vaccine can help protect against various cancers, awareness about head and neck cancer is the key. And knowing the signs and symptoms — such as sores in the mouth, a change in voice, pain with swallowing and a lump in the neck — is important.

“If one of those things lasts longer than two weeks, you should go to your doctor,” Kaufman said. “This can affect nonsmokers and nondrinkers. It’s not something that people expect. The more commonplace it becomes and the less stigma, the better.”

Doctors paying for sons to have cancer jab

Source: www.bbc.com
Author: Anna Collinson, Reporter, Victoria Derbyshire programme

Doctors and health professionals are regularly paying hundreds of pounds for their teenage sons to receive a vaccination against cancer that girls already receive for free on the NHS, the Victoria Derbyshire programme has been told. Is boys’ health being put at risk?

“Had the HPV vaccine been available when I was a boy, I believe I would not have developed throat cancer more than 30 years later,” said Jamie Rae, 53.

“I’m basing this on the overwhelming majority of research I have seen over the years and countless experts I have spoken to.

“That’s why I’m desperate for boys to be able to receive it.”

HPV is the name given to a large group of viruses. It is very common and can be caught through any kind of sexual contact with another person who already has it. Doctors say 90% of HPV infections go away by themselves – but sometimes infections can lead to a variety of serious problems. For boys, this includes cancer of the anus, penis, mouth and throat.

Since 2008, girls aged 12 to 18 across the UK have been offered HPV vaccinations as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme. It is currently not offered to boys of the same age, but it can be done privately, costing several hundred pounds.

Mr Rae founded the Throat Cancer Foundation after the treatment he received in 2010. He said at the time there was little information on HPV and he did not want anyone to go through his experience.

“I had radiotherapy for 35 days except weekends. I felt extreme burning in my neck and mouth and I was covered in sores. The pain was excruciating,” he explained. “It’s a lengthy recovery time. You have to teach yourself to swallow again and you get a dry mouth all the time.”

His foundation is part of HPV Action – which represents more than 50 groups and charities that are calling for both genders to receive the vaccination on the NHS.

‘Indefensible’
Mr Rae said the current disparity between boys and girls was “appalling”.

“Lots of doctors are having their boys vaccinated because they can afford it, as are those who are better informed,” he said. “But what about those who can’t afford it? Cases of throat cancer are soaring. It’s indefensible.

“Every day that goes past where boys are not being vaccinated condemns them to a whole host of diseases that we could prevent.”

HPV Action says around a dozen countries including Australia, Canada and the US are already vaccinating boys or are planning to do so in the near future. The government’s vaccination advisory committee is currently reviewing whether boys should receive the HPV vaccination.

A spokesperson for the Department of Health and Social Cares says it will carefully consider its advice once they’ve received it. Campaigners hope there will be a decision this year, possibly as soon as June. A debate is taking place on Wednesday at Westminster Hall about the issue.

The argument for vaccinating boys against HPV:

  • About 15% of UK girls eligible for vaccination are currently not receiving both doses, a figure which is much higher in some areas
  • Most older women in the UK have not had the HPV vaccination
  • Men may have sex with women from other countries with no vaccination programme
  • Men who have sex with men are not protected by the girls’ programme
  • The cost of treating HPV-related diseases is high – treating anogenital warts alone in the UK is estimated to cost £58m a year, while the additional cost of vaccinating boys has been estimated at about £20m a year

Source: HPV Action

With oral cancer on the rise, dentists can play an important role

Source: http://exclusive.multibriefs.com
Author: Tammy Adams

Today’s dental professionals routinely see and deal with many issues and conditions that were not so common just a few short decades ago. For example, there has been a marked increase in the incidence of oral cancer in the United States, sparking the need for regular oral cancer screening as part of a preventive dental checkup. This additional screening is now routinely performed in many dental practices across the nation.

The American Cancer Society estimates that around 50,000 Americans are infected with oral cancer each year. In past generations, oral cancer was mostly linked to smoking, alcohol use or a combination of the two. But even as smoking rates have fallen, oral cancer rates have risen (especially in men), and researchers have concluded that this is likely caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted disease.

Early diagnosis makes a difference
Oral cancer is often only discovered when the cancer has metastasized to another location, most commonly the lymph nodes of the neck. Prognosis at this stage of discovery is significantly worse than when it is caught in a localized intraoral area.

According to the Oral Cancer Foundation, the best way to screen for HPV-related oral and oropharyngeal cancer is through a visual and tactile exam given by a medical or dental professional, who will also perform an oral history taking to ask about signs and symptoms that cover things that are not visible.

Most of the symptoms of a developing HPV-positive infection are discovered by asking questions, using a test, a light or other device.

ADA supports dental industry with this growing challenge
In 2017, a panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs published a clinical practice guideline called the “Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation of Potentially Malignant Disorders in the Oral Cavity.”

The goal of this guideline is to inform dentists, orthodontists and other dental professionals about triage tools for evaluating lesions, including potentially malignant disorders, in the oral cavity. If you’re a dentist or an orthodontist, the ADA offers the following considerations concerning the diagnosis of oral and oropharyngeal cancers:

  • Clinicians should obtain an updated medical, social and dental history as well as perform an intraoral and extraoral conventional visual and tactile examination in all adult patients.
  • For patients with suspicious lesions, clinicians should immediately perform a biopsy of the lesion or refer the patient to a specialist.
  • Salivary and light-based tools are not recommended for evaluating lesions for malignancy.

If you are a dental professional and want to learn more about the dental industry’s role in addressing the rising occurrence of oral cancer, visit the ADA’s Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer page.

April, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

What’s the link between HPV and head and neck cancer?

Source: blogs.bcm.edu
Author: Dr. Michael Scheurer

As a molecular epidemiologist, I’ve been conducting research on human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers since my dissertation work in 2003. While working with the clinical faculty here at Baylor College of Medicine, I’ve heard many questions lately about the possibility of the HPV vaccine “helping treat” head and neck cancer (HNC).

It’s important to know the link between HPV and HNC because patients with HPV-positive tumors often have better survival rates than those with HPV-negative tumors. Check out these frequently asked questions to learn more about HPV and HNC.

What is HPV?

  • HPV is a sexually transmitted infection that can infect the oral cavity, tonsils, back of throat, anus, and genitals.
  • There are many types of HPV. Some types can cause cancer and other types can cause warts.
  • HPV infection is very common in the U.S. with more than 50 percent of adults being infected at some point in their lifetime.
  • There is no treatment for HPV infection.
  • For some people, their HPV infection naturally clears while others develop cancer after many years.

What is oropharyngeal cancer?

  • Oropharyngeal cancer occurs in the tonsils and back of throat.
  • In the U.S., HPV now causes most oropharyngeal cancers.
  • Most doctors would recommend that oropharyngeal cancers be tested for HPV.
  • Smoking and alcohol use can also increase risk of developing oropharyngeal cancer.

How did I get HPV infection in my mouth or throat?

  • The most likely route of exposure is by oral sex, although other routes may exist.
  • Performing oral sex and having many oral sex partners can increase your chances of oral HPV infection.
  • HPV is not transmitted casually by kissing on the cheek or sharing a drink with someone.
  • We do not know for sure if HPV is transmitted by open-mouth or “French” kissing.

What does it mean as a HNC patient if I have HPV in my tumor?

  • Many studies have shown that oropharyngeal cancer patients with HPV in their tumor have a better outcome than people without HPV.
  • These patients tend to respond better to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment for HNC. Appropriately selected patients also have excellent outcomes after surgery.

Is the HPV vaccine for me?

  • The HPV vaccines work by preventing people from getting new HPV infections.
  • These vaccines do not treat HPV infection or the cancers that HPV cause.
  • The vaccines are currently recommended for people ages nine to 26 years old.
April, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Accurately identifying aggressive head and neck cancers

Source: www.eurekalert.org
Author: press release

The Case Western Reserve-led research team will analyze computerized images of tissue samples for patterns which could become “biomarkers,” or predictors, for determining relative risk for recurrence in one particularly common type of head and neck cancers.

Those tumors, known as oropharyngeal cancers, occur primarily at the base of the tongue and in the tonsils.

Currently, however, oncologists tend to treat all of these tumors with the same aggressive level of therapy. This is the case even though many of the oropharyngeal tumors which are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV) tend to have favorable outcome-regardless of treatment-while another subset of the tumors progress and metastasize, or spread.

“Right now, it’s a one-size-fits-all therapy for all of these patients with HPV head and neck cancers,” said Anant Madabhushi, MD, the F. Alex Nason Professor II of Biomedical Engineering, founding director of the CCIPD at the Case School of Engineering and primary investigator in the new research.

“There are currently very few validated biomarkers and approaches that are accurate enough to be able to identify which of these cancers are more aggressive or which ones are less aggressive,” he said. “That has limited the ability of clinicians to even hold clinical trials to find out if they can de-escalate therapy for some of these patients-or who needs more aggressive therapy.”

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recently awarded a $3.15 million, five-year academic-industry partnership grant to Madabhushi and his team to pursue the research and build toward establishing those clinical trials.

Co-primary investigator on the grant is Vanderbilt University’s James Lewis Jr., MD, whose specialty is head and neck pathology, while Cleveland Clinic’s Shlomo Koyfman, MD, and David Adelstein, MD, are co-investigators with expertise in radiation and medical oncology.

Additionally, Pingfu Fu, an associate professor of population and quantitative health statistics at Case Western Reserve, brings expertise in biostatistics. Cheng Lu, a senior research associate in CCIPD is also involved with the project.

Madabhushi’s team is again working with Mark Lloyd, MD, of industry partner Inspirata Inc., the Florida-based company also teaming up with the lab on studies of breast and lung cancer-work supported by more than $6.3 million in NCI funding.

The team presented its data at the 2018 United States and Canadian Association of Pathology (USCAP) meeting in Vancouver this month and has generated data to suggest that the approach could soon become a clinically actionable tool.

Initial results on almost 400 oropharyngeal cancer patients suggests that the technology is independently prognostic of disease progression-meaning that it could stand alone in helping clinicians figure out how aggressive the disease is and then make a more informed decision on how aggressively to treat the cancer.

“In those cancers, they’ve established whether you can modulate your therapy based on the risk profile for those tumors,” Madabhushi said. “But in head and neck, clinicians might have a sense that there are different risk profiles for different patients, but nobody knows for certain. We want to change that by giving them the risk stratification tools to better help the patient.”

March, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Experts reveal why men are four times more likely to get cancer from oral sex than women

Source: www.thesun.co.uk
Author: Sofia Petkar

Men are four times more likely than women to be diagnosed with oral cancer, as studies suggest a lower immune system could be behind this. Research has found men who perform oral sex on their female partners have a higher than average chance of developing an oral cancer triggered by the human papilloma virus (HPV).

While sexual norms and fewer inhibitions have played a role in this alarming trend, scientists now say the male immune system is the real problem. Research has found that compared with women, men are more likely to be infected with HPV and its “high-risk” cancerous strains. Men are also less able to get rid of the infection through the body’s natural defences, harbouring the virus for longer periods of time.

Ashish A. Deshmukh, a University of Florida HPV researcher, said: “There is good evidence that men acquire oral infections more readily than women, even if they have similar sex practices.

“And more than the acquisition, it’s the persistence of the virus.

“The clearance rate is not that fast in men.”

Traditionally, smoking and heavy alcohol usage were seen as the big risk factors for oral cancer. However, studies have shown that non-HPV tumours linked to these bad habits has declined significantly in recent years. In stark contrast, HPV-related tumours have increased more than 300 per cent over the last 20 years, with the virus now found in 70 per cent of all new oral cancers.

In 2013, Michael Douglas hit the headlines when he blamed his throat cancer on oral sex. The 72-year-old actor said he believed his cancer was triggered by the HPV virus, which he says he contracted after performing oral sex.

While many ridiculed his theory, experts say there is growing evidence to support his claims. The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common sexually transmitted disease which affects at least half of people who are sexually active. The STD is the most widespread worldwide and four out of five of the population will contract some form of the virus at least once in their life.

The types of HPV found in the mouth are almost entirely sexually transmitted, so oral sex is seen as the primary route of contracting them. In most cases, the body’s immune system will fight off the virus and there won’t be any need for further tests, in fact, some people may not even know they contracted it at all.

The HPV infection affects the skin and mucosa (any moist membrane, such as the lining of the mouth and throat, the cervix and the anus).

Dentists have warned that dating apps such as Tinder are putting more people at risk of catching HPV passed on by oral sex. The British Dental Association said: “Data used to model sexual behaviour are out of date, and factors such as the recent introduction of dating apps may have led to significant changes in behaviour over the last few years, which have not been taken into account.”

March, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Australia may become the first country to eliminate one form of cancer

Author: Brad Jones
Date: March 8, 2018
Source: flipboard.com

The International Papillomavirus Society has announced that Australia could become the first country to eliminate cervical cancer entirely.

According to a new study, Australia’s efforts to distribute a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for free in schools have been a resounding success. The sexually transmitted infection causes 99.9 percent of cases of cervical cancer.

In 2007, the Australian federal government began offering the vaccine to girls aged 12-13, and in 2013 it was made available to boys, too. Girls and boys outside of that age bracket but under nineteen are also entitled to two free doses of the vaccine.

Between 2005 and 2015, the percentage of Australian women aged between 18 and 24 who had HPV dropped from 22.7 percent to just 1.1 percent. Immunization rates have increased further since 2015, contributing to what’s being described as a “herd protection” effect.

Coupled with a more advanced screening test that was introduced by the Australian government in December 2017, there are hopes that no new cases of cervical cancer will be reported within ten or twenty years.

THE WORLD ISN’T CATCHING UP

In the US, the HPV vaccine is not free. It can cost as much as $450 for the full regimen, according to the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, although financial assistance is often available. In 2016, 78.6% of 15-year-old Australian girls, and 72.9% of 15-year-old Australian boys were vaccinated – but only 50% of American girls between 13 and 17, and 38% of American boys between 13 and 17 had received the vaccination, as per data published by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

The situation is much worse in the developing world, where papillomavirus incidence rate remains high. “Two-thirds of the world’s population of women don’t get access to what Australian women do,” said Joe Tooma, the chief executive of the Australian Cervical Cancer Foundation. “Unless we do something, it will still be one of the major cancer killers in developing countries.”

Administering the HPV vaccine in schools has also proven to be effective in a trial that took place in Bhutan. Offering this kind of free access to the vaccine in other developing countries may seem like an expensive measure, but as the Australian example shows, it could ease the burden of cervical cancer down the line.

 

March, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

HPV is causing an oral cancer epidemic in men by outwitting natural defenses

Source: www.philly.com
Author: Marie McCullough, staff writer

Five years ago, when actor Michael Douglas candidly revealed that his throat cancer was linked to having oral sex, two things happened.

He made headlines that mortified his family. And he helped publicize the fact that a pervasive, sexually transmitted virus called HPV was unleashing an epidemic of oral cancer among men.

Since then, scientists have made headway in figuring out why HPV, the human papillomavirus, has this glaring gender bias. Men are four times more likely than women to be diagnosed with oral cancer, a hard-to-detect, hard-to-treat disease that has overtaken cervical cancer as the most common HPV-related malignancy in the United States.

To be sure, changes in sexual norms over the last few generations have played a role in this alarming trend. But research increasingly shows the real problem is something men have practically no control over: their immune response.

Compared with women, men are more likely to get infected with HPV — including “high-risk” cancer-causing strains. They also are less able to wipe out infection on their own, and more likely to get reinfected. The reasons are unclear.

“There is good evidence that men acquire oral infections more readily than women, even if they have similar sex practices,” said Ashish A. Deshmukh, a University of Florida HPV researcher. “And more than the acquisition, it’s the persistence of the virus. The clearance rate is not that fast in men.”

Michael Becker of Yardley has stepped up as the face of this immunological inequity. The 49-year-old former biotech executive is health-conscious, clean-living, happily married for 26 years – and battling terminal oropharyngeal cancer, the medical term for malignancies in parts of the mouth and throat.

He’s also battling the misconceptions and ignorance that keep too many parents from protecting their pubescent children — especially boys — against HPV-driven cancers. Two shots. That’s all it takes for the leading vaccine, Gardasil, to prevent most cervical cancers, less common genital malignancies, and the disease that is killing Becker.

“I can’t tell you how many emails I got from parents after the CBS segment,” he said, referring to a national television interview last month. “They said, ‘What do you mean this vaccine is for boys?’ and ‘What do you mean oral cancer incidence has eclipsed cervical cancer?’ ”

An inescapable virus
HPV is a family of more than 100 virus types that can live in the flat, thin cells on the surface of the skin, cervix, vagina, anus, vulva, penis, mouth, and throat. The virus is spread through contact with infected skin, mucous membranes, and bodily fluids. Some types can be passed during intercourse or — as Douglas pointed out — oral sex. While virtually all sexually active people will get infected at some point, the virus is usually wiped out by the immune system without so much as a symptom.

But not always.

In the cervix, persistent infection with high-risk HPV types can lead to precancerous changes that, left alone, slowly turn malignant. Fortunately, the Pap smear enables the detection and removal of abnormal cells before cancer develops. What’s more, age-related changes in cervical cells reduce the risk that HPV will take hold there as women get older.

No such screening test exists for oropharyngeal sites – the tongue, soft palate, tonsils, the throat behind the nasal cavity – and symptoms usually don’t appear until cancer is advanced. Becker, for example, had metastatic disease by the time he noticed a lump under his jaw line in late 2015.

Traditionally, smoking and heavy alcohol use are the big risk factors for oral cancer, but the non-HPV tumors linked to these bad habits have been declining in recent years. HPV-related tumors, in contrast, have increased more than 300 percent over the last 20 years. The virus is now found in 70 percent of all new oral cancers.

About 13,200 new HPV oral cancers are diagnosed in U.S. men each year, compared with 3,200 in women, according to federal data. Treatment — surgery, chemotherapy, radiation — can have disfiguring, disabling side effects. About half of late-stage patients die within five years.

Natural defenses go awry
Oral HPV infection rates are skewed by gender, just like the resulting cancers. The latest national estimates of this disparity, published in October, come from Deshmukh and his University of Florida colleagues. They used a federal health survey that collected DNA specimens to estimate that 7.3 percent of men and 1.4 percent of women have oral infections with high-risk HPV types. That translates to 7 million men and 1.4 million women.

The chance of oral infection increases for women as well as men who have simultaneous genital HPV infections or a history of many sex partners, but male infection rates still far surpass female rates.

Patti Gravitt, an HPV researcher at George Washington University, believes these estimates are a bit oversimplified because women counted as uninfected may actually have undetectably low virus levels, or HPV may be hiding in a dormant state in their cells.

Still, Gravitt said the study is in line with others that suggest “men are more susceptible to HPV viral infection than women.”

In women, an HPV infection usually sets off the body’s defense mechanisms. The immune system makes antibodies that kill off the invader, then immune cells remain on guard, ready to attack if the virus reappears.

But in men, something goes awry. The HIM study — for HPV in Men — documented this by collecting genital, anal, and oral samples from 4,100 unvaccinated men in Florida, Mexico and Brazil between 2005 and 2009. The samples were tested for the presence of two high-risk HPV types and two that cause genital warts.

Among 384 men who developed infections during a 24-month period, only 8 percent produced antibodies. But this response rate varied depending on the site of infection; none of the small number of orally infected men produced antibodies.

Rather than putting the immune system on guard and protecting men from the virus, infection sharply increased the chance of getting infected again with the exact same HPV type. And many men who got reinfected were celibate at the time.

How could this be? Anna R. Giuliano, the researcher at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., who led the HIM study, said recurring infections may be due to reactivation of dormant virus, or to auto-inoculation – the man spreads infection from one part of his body to another. Or to something else entirely.

While the scientific understanding of this puzzle is evolving, one implication is clear. “HPV vaccination is the only reliable method to ensure immune protection against new HPV infections and subsequent disease in males,” Giuliano and her co-authors declared in a recent paper.

Becker hammers that message – when he is not being hammered by chemotherapy – using his self-published memoir and his blog. This week’s blog gave a shout-out to Sunday’s first-ever International HPV Awareness Day, declared by Giuliano and other members of the International Papillomavirus Society.

Becker realizes that the novelty of the vaccine, the complexity of HPV, and its link to sex are obstacles to immunization. But he focuses on the life-saving aspect.

“Parents are being asked to vaccinate their 11-year-old child and they can’t imagine 30 or 40 years down the line, it will prevent cancer,” Becker said. “If you don’t know it’s connected to six cancers, you’re not going to care. So it really should be cast as an anti-cancer vaccine.”

March, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

Biofilms in tonsil crypts may explain HPV-related head and neck cancers

Source: www.genengnews.com
Author: staff

Human papilloma virus (HPV) encased in biofilms inside tonsil crypts (pictured) may explain why the roughly 5% of HPV-infected people who develop cancer of the mouth or throat are not protected by their immune systems. Tonsil crypts with HPV are shown in green; epithelial and biofilm layers are shown in red. [Katherine Rieth. M.D.]

How can human papilloma virus (HPV) be prevalent in otherwise healthy people not known to carry it? A just-published study concludes that the virus may be lurking in small pockets on the surface of their tonsils.

Researchers from University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) found HPV encased in biofilms inside tonsil crypts, where HPV-related head and neck cancers often originate. HPV is shed from the tonsil during an active infection and gets trapped in the biofilm, where it may be protected from immune attack.

In the crypts, the virus likely lays in wait for an opportunity to reinstate infection or invade the tonsil tissue to develop cancer.

“The virus gains access to the basal layer of stratified squamous epithelium through structural breaks in the stratified epithelial superstructure,” the investigators reported in the study. “Tonsillar crypt reticulated epithelium itself has been shown to contain numerous small blood vessels and has a discontinuous basement membrane, which may facilitate this infection and reinfection process.”

The URMC researchers said their finding could help prevent oropharyngeal cancers that form on the tonsils and tongue—and may explain why the roughly 5% of HPV-infected people who develop cancer of the mouth or throat are not protected by their immune systems.

HPV 16 and 18, high-risk strains that are known to cause cervical cancer, also cause head and neck cancers. While verified tests can detect HPV in people before they develop cervical cancer, that’s not the case with head and neck cancers, which according to a 2016 study are expected to outnumber cervical cancer cases by 2020.

“Far-Reaching Implications”
“Given the lack of universal HPV immunization and the potential for the virus to evade the immune system, even in individuals with detectable HPV in their blood, our findings could have far-reaching implications for identifying people at risk of developing HPV-related head and neck cancers and ultimately preventing them,” Matthew Miller, M.D., associate professor of otolaryngology and neurosurgery at URMC, said in a statement.

Dr. Miller and six colleagues detailed their findings in “Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Tonsil Tissue in Healthy Adults and Colocalization in Biofilm of Tonsillar Crypts,” published online January 25 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, and announced by URMC today. The study’s corresponding author is Katherine Reith, M.D., an otolaryngology resident at URMC.

The researchers carried out a retrospective, cross-sectional study using samples obtained from tonsils archived at a university hospital following elective nononcologic tonsillectomy from 2012 to 2015. The samples consisted of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of tumor-free tonsil tissue from 102 adults who had elective tonsillectomies and were between ages 20 and 39. More than half the patients (55, or 53.9%) were female.

Five of the samples contained HPV and four contained HPV 16 and 18. In every case, HPV was found in tonsil crypts biofilms.

HPV status was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and high-risk subtypes 16 and 18 were assessed with quantitative PCR assay. Samples that demonstrated presence of HPV were then analyzed by in situ hybridization to localize the viral capsid protein.

These samples were then stained with concanavalin A to establish biofilm presence and morphology and with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to visualize location of the virus in relation to cell nuclei. Data was assembled for aggregate analysis to colocalize HPV in the biofilm of the tonsillar crypts, the URMC researchers reported.

The research team plans to develop topical antimicrobials designed to disrupt the biofilm and allow the immune system to clear the virus—part of their investigation of potential screening tools, such as an oral rinse, to detect HPV in the mouth and throat.

February, 2018|Oral Cancer News|

NHS immunises girls but not boys against potentially deadly HPV virus because its ‘not cost-effective’

Source: www.thesun.co.uk
Author: Jacob Dirnhuber

Girls aged 12 to 13 are already vaccinated for free against the HPV virus, which can cause deadly tumours in the throat and mouth, but boys have to do without.

Experts believe it would take £22 million a year to vaccinate every boy in Britain against the deadly disease – a fraction of the vast £148 billion NHS budget. But low overall infection rates mean that bean-counters refuse to sign off on any additional funding – condemning thousands to months of expensive, agonising cancer treatment.

Cambridge University Professor Margaret Stanley blasted: “You cannot protect against these cancers by only vaccinating half the population.”

She told the Mail on Sunday: “Not to immunise boys is classic Treasury short-termism. You may not spend so much now, but it will cost far more years later.

“We are in the midst of an HPV pandemic.”

HPV is generally spread through genital and oral sex, and can also be transmitted by kissing – meaning that some people who contract it are virgins. Only a tiny minority of those infected go on to develop cancer, often decades after they contract the virus. An estimated 80 per cent of all adults in the UK have been infected at some point.

Throat and cancer specialist Professor Christopher Nutting said: “My patients are being struck down by a preventable cancer that will affect them for the rest of their lives.

“It’s unfair that women are protected but men are not. The vaccine will work. It is starting to make cervical cancer incredibly rare. Why wouldn’t we do the same for cancer of the throat?’

Figures show that in 2011 alone the HPV virus triggered cancers in 1,850 people – and a staggering 1,400 of those were men.

Businessman Chris Curtis, 59, who contracted oropharyngeal cancer after becoming infected, said: “There is something out there that can stop this happening. We’ve got to use it.”

Opening up about his harrowing time with the disease, he said: “My family would eat in the dining room and I would be stuck being fed through my tube by machine.

“I planned suicide twice. All that stopped me was the thought of my kids.

“You’ve seen the cream-cracker challenge? ” live with that every minute of every day. I look at a burger and chips and I see cardboard. If I eat a tomato, it feels like it’s exploding in my mouth – it’s intolerable.

“For months the cancer takes over your life, and there is no respite. It tests you to breaking point.”

Prof Pollard, of the NHS Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, said the committee could only recommend vaccinating boys if it found this conformed with the “health technology assessment methodology’, which is derived from the Treasury’s ‘Green book’.

“Under the rules we are only looking at cost-effectiveness from the health providers’ perspective.”

“Each possible vaccine had to be considered in the context of the NHS as a whole”

January, 2018|Oral Cancer News|