cheapest parallels mac windows xp professional buy cheap adobe master collection cs5 price of cs4 design premium cost of guitar pro 6 cheap paragon ntfs cost of dreamweaver cs5 microsoft office professional 2010 cheapest price buy windows xp with service pack 3 discount microsoft project 2010 student buy rosetta stone spanish cost of outlook 2007 upgrade buy toast 10 buy ms office where can i buy microsoft office cheap
cheapest office 2007 professional academic buy adobe audition cc 2014 purchase after effects cs3 cost of macphun intensify buy windows home server 2011 license buy photoshop elements 6.0 mac purchase microsoft office 2007 basic buying windows 7 home premium oem purchase macgourmet deluxe price of coreldraw graphics suite x7 best price adobe incopy cc 2014 price of photoshop 8 best buy microsoft office 2003 professional cost of matlab parallel computing toolbox best price final cut express 4

NIH scientists find promising biomarker for predicting HPV-related oropharynx cancer

Tue, Jun 18, 2013

Oral Cancer News

Source: National Cancer Institute
Published: 6-17-13

 

Researchers have found that antibodies against the human papillomavirus (HPV) may help identify individuals who are at greatly increased risk of HPV-related cancer of the oropharynx, which is a portion of the throat that contains the tonsils.

In their study, at least 1 in 3 individuals with oropharyngeal cancer had antibodies to HPV, compared to fewer than 1 in 100 individuals without cancer.  When present, these antibodies were detectable many years before the onset of disease. These findings raise the possibility that a blood test might one day be used to identify patients with this type of cancer.

HPV-16_genome_organization

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Genomic structure of HPV

 

 

 

The results of this study, carried out by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), were published online June 17,  2013, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Historically, the majority of oropharyngeal cancers could be explained by tobacco use and alcohol consumption rather than HPV infection. However, incidence of this malignancy is increasing in many parts of the world, especially in the United States and Europe, because of increased infection with HPV type 16 (HPV16). In the United States it is estimated that more than 60 percent of current cases of oropharyngeal cancer are due to HPV16.  Persistent infection with HPV16 induces cellular changes that lead to cancer.

HPV E6 is one of the viral genes that contribute to tumor formation. Previous studies of patients with HPV-related oropharynx cancer found antibodies to E6 in their blood.

“Our study shows not only that the E6 antibodies are present prior to diagnosis—but that in many cases, the antibodies are there more than a decade before the cancer was clinically detectable, an important feature of a successful screening biomarker,” said Aimee R. Kreimer, Ph.D., the lead Investigator from the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, NCI.

Kreimer and her colleagues tested samples from participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study, a long-term study of more than 500,000 healthy adults in 10 European countries. Participants gave a blood sample at the start of the study and have been followed since their initial contribution.

The researchers analyzed blood from 135 individuals who developed oropharyngeal cancer between one and 13 years later, and nearly 1,600 control individuals who did not develop cancer. The study found antibodies against the HPV16 E6 protein in 35 percent of the individuals with cancer, compared to less than 1 percent of the samples from the cancer-free individuals. The blood samples had been collected on average, six years before diagnosis, but the relationship was independent of the time between blood collection and diagnosis. Antibodies to HPV16 E6 protein were even found in blood samples collected more than 10 years before diagnosis.

The scientists also report that HPV16 E6 antibodies may be a biomarker for improved survival, consistent with previous reports. Patients in the study with oropharyngeal cancer who tested positive for HPV16 E6 antibodies prior to diagnosis were 70 percent more likely to be alive at the end of follow-up, compared to patients who tested negative.

“Although promising, these findings should be considered preliminary,” said Paul Brennan, Ph.D., the lead investigator from IARC. “If the predictive capability of the HPV16 E6 antibody holds up in other studies, we may want to consider developing a screening tool based on this result.”

 

OCF NOTE: OCF is privileged to have a member of the National Cancer Institute, who has a strong background in Oral Cancer and HPV, as a member of our Science Advisory Board. 

*This news story was resourced by the Oral Cancer Foundation, and vetted for appropriateness and accuracy.

 

Print Friendly
Be Sociable, Share!
, , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.